Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 6th Global Summit and Expo on Food & Beverages Florida, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Aristo Vojdani

Immunosciences Lab. Inc.
USA

Keynote: Immune reactivity against food proteomes

Time : 10:30-11:00

OMICS International Food Summit 2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Aristo Vojdani photo
Biography:

Aristo Vojdani has obtained his MSc and PhD in the field of Microbiology and Clinical Immunology at Bar-Ilan University in Israel with Postdoctoral studies in Tumor Immunology at UCLA. His research focused on predictive antibodies and the role of environmental triggers in autoimmune disorders. He holds 15 US patents for laboratory assessments and has published about 160 articles in scientific peer-reviewed journals and other publications. He is the CEO and Technical Director of Immunosciences Lab and is the Chief Scientific Advisor for Cyrex Labs. He sits on the Editorial Board of five scientific journals.

Abstract:

While immunologic reactivity to Wheat and Milk Proteomes has been extensively researched the immune response to many other food antigens and peptides has not been characterized. Despite this lack of standardization, thousands of food IgG and IgA antibody assays are still reported by many laboratories to health care practitioners. In many cases, false-positive test results and the removal of the indicated foods from the diet can have a very negative impact. The root of these testing problems stems from improper preparation of the food extracts; the use of only raw food antigens and not also processed foods; the lack of a proper validation process on an individual antigen basis and the cross-reactivity of food antigens with antibodies against infectious agents. In our study we investigated immune reactivity against various raw and or modified food antigens after taking all the biochemical steps necessary to ensure reproducible test results. These antibodies were further analyzed for reactivity to infectious agents as well as to different tissue antigens such as thyroid, islet cell antigens, adrenal gland, joints, heart, skin, gut, brain, etc. While cross-reaction between food proteins and the production of antibodies against them may have some protective value against the infections, their immune reaction against tissue antigens may play a role in autoimmune reactivity. Therefore, if food immune reactivity’s are detected reliably, the removal of the responsible immunological food triggers can then be the basis of the development of proper treatment and the prevention of autoimmune diseases which affect about 10% of the world population.

Keynote Forum

Lawrence Smith

Electrolyzer Corp.
USA

Keynote: Eliminating toxic chemicals from the processing of foods

Time : 11:00-11:30

OMICS International Food Summit 2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Lawrence Smith photo
Biography:

Mr. Smith has spent his whole career in the food industry, including retail, distribution and manufacturing. After spending time in Mergers & Acquisitions, he was brought by minority investors into an electrolyzed water company. Just four years later, the company was bought out by a large chemical company and immediately closed down. Mr. Smith has now completed his eleventh year in the electrolyzed water industry (EO) and is currently working as a consultant to manufacturers and users. Over the years, he has become both a strong proponent of EO and a strong opponen of the use of toxic chemicals in the food industry, hospitality industry, healthcare and agriculture industries.

Abstract:

The three Sustainability Factors: environmental, social, and economic. The devastating impact toxic chemicals are having on the environment, how chemicals are compromising the health of your children and the stunning economic impact of reducing toxic chemicals.

  • Track 1: Frontiers in Food Science
    Track 3: Food Physical Chemistry
    Track 6: Fermentation Technology, Bioprocess and Cell Culture
Speaker
Biography:

Danielle Laure Taneyo Saa is a researcher in University Of Bologna, Italy.

Abstract:

The idea that modern humans have diverged too far from the lifestyle of our prehistoric ancestors, including food habits and with consequent reduced resistance to diseases is an interesting proposition suggested by Eaton and Konnor in 1985. Many traditional fermented foods are based on lactic acid fermentation in association with yeasts or molds. Moreover whole grains are concentrated sources of nutrients and phytochemicals with well-known beneficial effects for human health. Whole cereal sourdough fermentations showed significant potential in improvement of the nutritional quality and health effects of foods and ingredients. In addition, sourdough can also actively retard starch digestibility leading to low glycemic responses, modulate levels and bioaccessibility of bioactive compounds and improve mineral bioavailability. In order to facilitate the industry to face the consumers increasing awareness of the health benefits of whole cereals in Europe, novel functional bakery food formulations which could be more easily adopted in the everyday diet were launched. However the complexity of variables involved (agronomic traits, processing, bioaccessibility, bioavailability etc.) requires an “holistic” approach. With that aim the scientific bases for two examples of functional fermented bread will be describe: To exploit fermentation processes to improve the nutritional quality and health effects of non conventional whole grain breads (Kamut® Khorasan wheat and Einkorn) and to use bread as food vehicle (vector) to increase the intake of bioactive iron. Different aspects will be considered such as nutritional and sensorial aspects, anti-inflammatory activity, effect on gut microbiota and metabolites.

Speaker
Biography:

Balunkeswar Nayak is an Assistant Professor of Food Processing at the School of Food & Agriculture in the University of Maine, Orono, United States. Prior to joining at the University of Maine, he has worked as a postdoctoral fellow in the Food Allergy Research and Resources Program at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He received his Ph.D. in Food Engineering from Washington State University, Pullman, WA. He has more than 10 years of experience in agricultural, post-harvest and food engineering studying on vegetable bioactive compounds during various bioprocesses.

Abstract:

The “ideal” extraction method must provide high extraction rates and should be non-destructive and time saving. In addition, as per the environmental requirements and economic impact, the food and nutraceutical industry prefer green extraction and processing to ensure a safe and high quality extract/product. Recently, more rapid and automated methods including supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) or microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), ultrasound extraction (UAE) and accelerated solvent extractor (ASE) have been used. The above extraction methods are advantageous compared to conventional methods because they can be carried out in the absence of light and oxygen, cope with the demand for a reduction in organic solvent consumption and improve the extraction time due to the possibility of working at elevated temperatures or pressures in inert atmospheres. The use of bioactive compounds in different commercial sectors such as pharmaceutical, food and chemical industries signifies the need of the most appropriate and standard method to extract these active components from plant materials. Along with conventional methods, numerous new methods have been established but till now no single method is regarded as standard for extracting bioactive compounds from plants. The efficiencies of conventional and non-conventional extraction methods mostly depend on the critical input parameters; understanding the nature of plant matrix; chemistry of bioactive compounds and scientific expertise. This talk is aimed to discuss different extraction techniques along with their basic mechanism for extracting bioactive compounds from medicinal plants.

Speaker
Biography:

Dong-Ung Lee has completed his PhD from Regensburg University (Germany) and Postdoctoral studies from the same university (Institute of pharmacy). He is a Full Professor of Dongguk University (Korea) and has published more than 140 papers.

Abstract:

Coniferic acid (CA) is found in the seeds of coffee, apple, peanut and orange as well as in both seeds and cell walls of commelinid plants. This phenolic compound has been reported to possess antioxidant, anticancer and anti inflammatory activities. We have investigated the hepatoprotective effect of CA against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced acute liver injury. Mice were treated intraperitoneally with vehicle or CA (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg) 1 hour before and 2 hours after CCl4 (20 μl/kg) injection. The serum activities of aminotransferases and the hepatic level of malondialdehyde were significantly higher after CCl4 treatment while the concentration of reduced glutathione was lower. These changes were attenuated by CA. The serum level and mRNA expression of TNF-α significantly increased after CCl4 treatment and CA attenuated these increases. The levels of i-NOS and COX-2 protein and mRNA expression after CCl4 treatment were significantly higher and CA reduced these increases. CCl4-treated mice showed increased nuclear translocation of NF-κB, and decreased levels of inhibitors of NF-κB in cytosol. Also, CCl4 significantly increased the level of phosphorylated JNK and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and nuclear translocation of activated c-Jun. CA significantly attenuated these changes. We also found that acute CCl4 challenge induced TLR4, TLR2 and TLR9 protein and mRNA expression and CA significantly inhibited TLR4 expression. These results suggest that CA protects from CCl4-induced acute liver injury through reduction of oxidative damage and inflammatory signaling pathways.

Speaker
Biography:

Oluwatoyin Oluwole is a research scientist at federal institute of industrial research oshodi, lagos

Abstract:

The activity of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) in Dioscorea rotundata Var. laasirin and the adequacy of heat and chemical treatment in inhibiting this enzyme were investigated in this study. PPO was inhibited by hot water blanching at 95o C for 7 minutes and coded as BOX. Chemical treatment using 0.1% Food grade sodium meta-bisulphite was also carried out and coded as XOX while a combination of both the physical method involving heat treatment and chemical methods was used and coded as BXX. The activity of polyphenol oxidase was determined using spectrophotometric method. A significant difference was evidenced in polyphenol oxidase activity amongst the various inhibition methods. The BXX method showed the highest level of inhibition followed by the BOX method and the XOX method. The yam chips produced using the BXX method can therefore be adopted for its commercial production by different categories of food processors for industrial utilization of white yam.