Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 6th Global Summit and Expo on Food & Beverages Florida, USA.

Day 3 :

  • Track 4: Food Processing and Packaging Technologies
    Track 5: Industrial Application of Food Technology
    Track 10: Nutritional Management and Nutritional Deficiencies

Session Introduction

Ian James Martins

Edith Cowan University
Australia

Title: Nutritional therapy activates the anti-aging process to reverse accelerated global diseases

Time : 11:30-12:00

Speaker
Biography:

Ian James Martins is a Reviewer for various journals and was appointed as the Chief Editor for Scientific and Academic Publishing (2013/2014). Research Gate’s analysis of his publication stats place the RG score higher than 93% of the international researchers. He has completed his PhD in 1987 and is a Fellow Edith Cowan University/Honorary Fellow (University Western Australia).

Abstract:

The global obesity and diabetes epidemic has indicated that projected health care costs to related medical expenses to be 344 billion dollars to the year 2018 and may account for 21% of health costs in the United States. The rate of the most prevalent chronic disease such as NAFLD has become of global (20-30%) concern with its links to the metabolic syndrome and neurodegenerative disease. The gene-environment interaction may involve the consumption of food that induces insulin resistance and involves alteration in nuclear receptors such as Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) that is connected to senescence in obesity and diabetes. Dietary calorie restriction activates the anti-aging gene Sirt1 that is regulated by various transcription factors with the activation of other genes essential for reversal of chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, stroke and neurodegenerative diseases in various communities. Activation of Sirt 1 in the liver leads to rapid clearance of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and lipophilic xenobiotics associated with fat absorption. High fibre diets have become important for the treatment of NAFLD with the reduction in the content of tissue LPS and xenobiotics. Nutrigenomic diets have become important to the design of specific foods for therapeutic purposes with activation of Sirt 1 connected to rapid hepatic LPS and amyloid beta metabolism with the prevention of NAFLD. Early nutritional intervention with calorie restriction will delay NAFLD with anti-aging therapy involved in tissue maintenance of cells and reversal of cellular senescence relevant to global metabolic disease.

Speaker
Biography:

Yanni Papanikolaou previously worked for the Kellogg Company as Director of Nutrition Marketing in the USA and Associate Director for Nutrition and Regulatory Affairs in Canada. At Kellogg, he led strategy development and leveraged nutrition science to influence government bodies on policy development and in the creation of evidence-based consumer and health professional messaging. He holds a Masters of Health Science in Public Health Nutrition and is completing a PhD at University of Toronto focusing on nutrition and brain health. He is an accomplished, peer-reviewed author in scientific/medical journals and books chapters and has presented at major nutrition conferences worldwide.

Abstract:

The current analyses identified commonly consumed grain patterns in US children (2-18 years old; N=8,367; 4,263 males/4,104 females) and compared nutrient intakes and obesity-related outcomes of subjects in various grain consumption patterns to those not consuming grains. Data were from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES; 2005-2010) and cluster analyses isolated the grain patterns: Breads/rolls, crackers/salty snacks, quick breads, pancakes/waffles/French toast/other grains, cakes/cookies/pies, pasta/cooked cereals/rice, cereals and no grains. Males consuming pasta/cooked cereals/rice had lower total fat intake (69±2 vs. 80±4g/d; p=0.008) while females consuming breads/rolls, cereals, pasta/cooked cereals/rice, crackers/salty snacks, pancakes/waffles/French toast/other grains had less total fat vs. no grains (64±1, 61±2, 59±1, 67±1, 63±1, 67±1 vs. 71±1g/d; all p<0.05). Several grain patterns resulted in significantly less saturated fat intake vs. no grains [Males: pasta/cooked cereals/rice (-6 g/d), crackers/salty snacks (-3 g/d), pancakes/waffles/French toast/other grains (-3 g/d); Females: breads/rolls (-2 g/d), cereals (-3 g/d), pasta/cooked cereals/rice (-5 g/d), crackers/salty snacks (-2 g/d), pancakes/waffles/French toast (-3 g/d)]. Males and females had greater dietary fiber intake when consuming cereals (2-3 g/d), crackers/salty snacks (2 g/d) and quick breads (3 g/d) while only females had increased fiber when consuming breads/rolls (2 g/d), vs. no grains. In males, BMI Z-scores were lower in all patterns except cakes/cookies/pies while in females, lower scores resulted in all patterns except cakes/cookies/pies and cereals. Males and females consuming pasta/cooked cereals/rice had a reduced risk for being overweight or obese vs. no grains [Odds Ratios (confidence intervals)=0.42 (0.25-0.72) and 0.40 (0.17-0.92)] respectively). A variety of grain patterns intake in children was associated with improved nutrient intakes and obesity-related outcomes.

John Leung

Food Allergy Center at Tufts Medical Center
USA

Title: Nutritional management of food allergy and intolerance
Speaker
Biography:

John Leung is the Director of the Food Allergy Center at Tufts Medical Center and Floating Hospital for Children. He attended medical school at University of Michigan Medical School and completed his internal medicine residency at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. He then finished a Gastroenterology fellowship at Tufts Medical Center. He worked as a gastroenterology consultant at Tufts Medical Center for a year before completing an Allergy/Immunology clinical and research fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School. His clinical and research program focus are on eosinophilic esophagitis, food allergy and food intolerances. He has coauthored more than 40 peer-reviewed manuscripts, scientific abstracts, book chapters and online tutorials.

Abstract:

This lecture provides an overall and update on the nutritional management of food allergy and intolerance. Specifically, we will discuss the similarities and differences between food allergy and food intolerance, diagnostic challenges, nutritional management of specific food allergy (nuts, milk, seafood, eggs, soy, meats and food additive) and new diagnostic and therapeutic modalities for food allergy and intolerance

Speaker
Biography:

Carol Henry is an Associate Professor in College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan. She received her MSc in Food Systems Administration from Loma Linda University, California, and MEd and PhD (Education, policy) from the University of Western Ontario in 2003. As a practitioner-scholar in community-engaged research, she leads a multifaceted research agenda focusing on food and nutrition security with a cross-disciplinary approach integrating agriculture, nutrition and health. She is also part of several international research programs using food based strategies to promote health. She has published widely in international conference proceedings and scientific journals.

Abstract:

Chickpea and haricot bean are pulse foods which constitute an essential part of human diet. However, their nutritional importance is affected by the presence of anti-nutritional factors such as phytate. Limited information is available on its content in pulses following food processing. We investigated changes in nutrient and anti-nutrient content due to combination of thermal and non-thermal food processing; the non-thermal food processing included soaking and germination. Chickpea and bean varieties were obtained from Debreziet and Hawassa research centers, Ethiopia, respectively. Hydration capacity of bean varieties ranged from 69.7% ± 4.1 to 103.8% ± 0.3 while the hydration capacity of chickpea varieties ranged from 81.5% ± 0.5 to 97.7% ± 2.5. There was significant difference in cooking time (19-65 minutes) of chickpea varieties; the lowest cooking time was noted for Habru. Among bean varieties, the cooking time of Red Wolayita was significantly different from Nasir and Hawassa Dume; it took more than twice to cook (p value < 0.01). The phytate content of Habru-based products was reduced by 16-52% during soaking and germination treatments. In case of Hawassa Dume-based products, the phytate content was reduced by 8-35% during soaking and germination treatments with the highest percentage of phytate reduction obtained in 48 and 72 hour germination. Soaking and germination are effective household strategies to reduce the levels of phytate in pulse-based foods. Determining food processing strategies that will reduce anti-nutrients thereby maximizing the utilization of minerals from pulse-based diets is an important step to designing food based interventions.

Speaker
Biography:

Bayu Kanetrois a lecturer of Food Technology Department, Mercu Buana Yogyakarta University, Indonesia He obtained doctoral degree of Food Science in Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta, Indonesia at 2009.

Abstract:

This research was aimed to determine the potency of hipocholestrolemic and hipoglycemic of oyek from dried fermented cassava with addition of cowpeas sprout through in vivo bioassay by using Sprague Dawley male rats. The treatments of the research were rat condition and feed treatment. The first treatment were normal rats and diabetic rats which was induced by aloxan injection, and the second treatment were standart feed and oyek feed which was prepared by subtitution of corn strach in standart feed with the oyek.). The blood triglyceride, cholesterol total, High Density Lipoprotein (HDL), Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL), and glucose of rats were analysed on 3th, and 18 th days for the treatment and before the treatment as control (0th). The result of this research showed that the potency of hypocholesterolemic were shown by decreasing of blood triglyceride, cholesterol total, LDL, and increasing of blood HDL in diabetics rats with oyek treatment. The potency of hypoglycemic were shown by decreasing of blood glucose level in diabetic rats with oyek treatment. On 18th days treatment, The blood glucose of the diabetic rats with standard feed increased and they were still diabetec. While the blood glucose of diabetic rats with oyek feed treatment reduced 20% on 18th days after the treatment, although they are still diabetic. That was indicated that oyek might be potential to normalize blood glucose for more than 18 days feed treatment.