Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 11th Global Summit on Food & Beverages Las Vegas, Nevada, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Randy Krotz

United States farmers & Ranchers Association, USA

Keynote: New Approaches on Farms and Farmers Practices

Time : 10:15-10:45

OMICS International Food Summit 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Randy Krotz photo
Biography:

Randy Krotz serves as the chief executive officer of the U.S. Farmers & Ranchers Alliance® (USFRA®), a consumer focused ag movement consisting of more than 90 farmer and rancher led organizations and industry partners engaged in dialogue about growing and raising food. In addition to nearly 25 years of experience in food, health care, agriculture and biotechnology, Krotz continues to play an active role on the farm in North Central Kansas where he was raised. USFRA works to bridge the gap between consumers and agriculture with regard to animal care, use of antibiotics and hormones, GMOs and crop inputs, including water, fertilizer and pesticides. Additionally, the organization conducts extensive research including their latest project on linkages with consumers regarding sustainability. Randy travels the country meeting with key players in the ongoing food movement, restaurant and food industries, policy makers and key leaders in agriculture.  He regularly moderates panel discussions on food, including at the recent Sustainable Agricultural Summit where representatives from McDonald’s, Kellogg, and Walmart highlighted efforts to move toward a more sustainable future. He has also led discussions on sustainable beef with the National Restaurant Association. Randy has lived all across the U.S. and worked for and/or represented many well-known food and agribusiness companies and associations including FMC Corporation, National Corn Growers Association, Grocery Manufacturers Association, BASF, Proctor & Gamble, Syngenta, DuPont Pioneer, Pepsi Nutrition and Monsanto. Randy is a graduate of Kansas State University.

Abstract:

TBA

Keynote Forum

Mark T Norman

International Wine Professional Network, USA

Keynote: Time For a New Approach to Wine Sales

Time : 10:45-11:15

OMICS International Food Summit 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mark T Norman photo
Biography:

Co-founder of International Wine Professional network, our goal is to help wine business to become more competitive in today's adult beverage market!  My other business is World Wine Marketing, a company devoted to helping wine lovers discover new wines from small production wineries by directly promoting both the wineries & wines to consumers. Taught various courses on technology & Internet marketing professionally and at the college level. Utilizing state of the art marketing techniques, coupled with expert electronic networking skills, my ability to reach and influence both business professional and consumers is unsurpassed. 

Abstract:

Viticultural has been transformed by technology.  Satelites are being used for canopy management, remote water sensors are allowing for better irrigation practices, and science is developing more disease resistant clones for use in the vineyards. In the wine cellar, winemakers are utilzing smart devices to control temperatures during fermentation.  More precise measurements are allowing a more consistent wine production with fewer and fewer mistakes. Yet the approach to wine selling and CRM has changed little over the last decade. Today's wine drinkers are a part of the digitally transformed American consumers who are using smart phone wine apps to make wine choices with confidence. A business discussion on how and why American wineries need to change in order to engage and approach a very changed wine audience

Break: 11:15- 11:30 - Coffee break
  • Special Session by Randox Foods, UK
Speaker
Biography:

Randox Food Diagnostics offer remarkable tools for the screening of antimicrobials, growth promoting hormones and drugs of abuse in animals and produce. Offering superb limits of detections and simple sample preparations, Randox Food Diagnostics has an extensive and expanding range consisting of 38 ELISA’s and 16 multiplex screening platforms. Our comprehensive range and trusted screening solutions are intertwined with continually improving the standards of global food safety.

Abstract:

To ensure food and feed safety, as well as quality in the respect of compliance towards legislative requirements, the efficient determination of certain analytes in different matrices is key. Biochip Array Technology, utilising the semi-automated benchtop biochip analyser Evidence Investigator, provides a platform for the simultaneous determination of multiple drug residues from a single sample. The technology uses miniaturized immunoassays, with implications in the reduction of sample/reagent consumption and an increase in the output of test results. Up to 45 tests can be carried out per biochip. Image processing, quantification and validation are then carried out by instrument specific software. Biochip Array Technology is used in various industries throughout the world for the analysis of drug residues. Residues currently being detected with this technology include: antimicrobials, anthelmintics, coccidiostats, beta-agonists, growth promoters and synthetic steroids. Drug residues are being detected faster and more easily with Biochip Array Technology in multiple sample types including meat, seafood, honey, milk and urine. Recent developments in this technology also allows multi-mycotoxin detection for the feed and grain industries with use of the new mycotoxin range of arrays, which allow the screening of a broad range of mycotoxins simultaneously, including aflatoxins, fumonisins, ochratoxin A, trichothecenes A (T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin), trichothecenes B (deoxynivalenol), zearalenone, diacetoxyscirpenol, ergot alkaloids and paxilline. In the dairy industry, the application of the Infiniplex Array for milk delivers a quantitative result for 180+ analytes across four residue groups including antibiotics, mycotoxins, anti-inflammatories and anti-parasitic drugs. Randox Food Diagnostics also offers a versatile range of kits for the wine, beverage and fermentation industries. Using enzymatic and colorimetric principles, the semi-automated benchtop analyser RX altona enables rapid and frequent monitoring of the production process and quality control of both raw materials and the finished wine product. The kits currently available for use include: ethanol, acetic acid, citric acid, tartaric acid, total sulphates, ammonia, glucose/fructose, lactic acid, malic acid, potassium and total antioxidant status. The kit portfolio is continually expanding, and has also recently been extended to also include the detection of glucose/ fructose and diastase in honey.

  • Special Session on Mycotoxins nd Fungi Food Decontamination by GRAS Methods

Session Introduction

Vildes Scussel

Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil

Title: Mycotoxins nd Fungi Food Decontamination by GRAS Methods

Time : 12:30-13:30

Speaker
Biography:

She is working as a Professor Food Science and Technology Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil. Her experience includes various programs, contributions and participation in different countries for diverse fields of study. Her research interests reflect in her wide range of publications in various national and international journals.  She has extended his valuable service for many years and has been a recipient of many award and grants.

Abstract:

The food producing regions in the world are mainly concentrated in zones where excess rainfall, together with high and/or extreme variation of temperatures occur, which induce biological contaminants (insects, mites and fungi - including toxigenic strains) proliferation. To control them, pesticide application can be performed both in the field and during storage of grains, including food packaging. However, if applied inappropriately, it can also turn as a contamination problem (pesticide residues persistence). Moreover, some contaminants are resistant to milling and heating processes and may remain in the food products, thus getting into the food chain. Although the prevention of fungi proliferation and mycotoxin formation in the field are the main goals, under certain environmental conditions their contamination (Fusarium / Alternaria / Aspergillus / Penicillium – DON / FBs / ZON / A-OH / A-ME / AFLs / OTA / PTL) are unavoidable for producers. Thus, decontamination procedures are useful in order to recuperate fungi and mycotoxin contaminated commodities. The ideal decontamination procedure acceptable from the environmental/health point of view must (a) react specifically with the living organism / compound to be destroyed/degraded; (b) not form toxic by-products (with toxicity equal to, or higher than the target contaminant); (c) not alter the food nutritional & palatability properties and be (d) inexpensive / easy to obtain. The increasing concern on environmental safety and human health has stimulated the development and/or improvement of non-aggressive food disinfection / decontamination substances in order to avoid and/or minimize their application impact. To date new technologies for fungi and their toxins decontamination have been developed involving different approaches, including micro-nutrients (zinc, at nano and regular particle sizes), gases absorber pads (O2 scavenger in packaged food), plant extracts (post harvest application), radiations (different wavelengths & pulse) and hermetic/controlled atmosphere environments (vacuum, CO2 / N2 at storage/package level). Several of them are GRAS (generally recognized as safe). Different oxidizing agents have been also reported and applied as decontaminants to destroy living organisms (apart from insects mites and fungi, also bacteria, viruses and protozoa,) and/or degrade toxic compounds (pesticides. mycotoxins and industry toxic wastes). The chemical compounds most commonly used are: hydrogen peroxide, chlorine, chlorine dioxide, sodium hypochlorite and potassium permanganate.  The green method that has been shown its decontamination efficiency to post-harvest high (fruits / vegetables) and low (grain / nuts / pulses) humidity food, without leaving residue is ozone (O3), both as gas or in the liquid form. As O3 gas is internationally recognized as safe (GRAS) and does not leave residues in food, it can be a promising method for fungi and toxin inactivation & degradation (either solely or in combination with other decontamination methods) in storage units and industries to avoid food security and safety problems. Note: still the prevention and control are the main solution, followed by raw materials selection (prior entrance to storage unities and/or industries). If none of them control fungi and toxins presence/formation, then apply decontamination by choosing the safer procedure for each food consumption purpose.

 

Break: 13:30-14:30- Lunch Break
  • Food Biotechnology, Application in Food & beverage Industry, Viticulture & Enology
Speaker

Chair

Mirjana Menkovska

Ss.Cyril and Methodius University, Macedonia

Speaker

Co-Chair

Vildes Scussel

University of Santa Carina, Brazil

Speaker
Biography:

Khaled El Saadany has done his PhD practical work in KVL University, Denmark and Alexandria University, Egypt. In 2014, he got a project from STDF to establish Functional Food and Nutraceutical Lab in Alexandria University. He is the Executive Manager of Grants, Innovation and Technology Transfer Center. He is Visiting Professor through Erasmus Mundus at Food and Health Department, Cardiff Metropolitan University, Cardiff, UK. He has 12 years working experience with EU, International Bank & USAID projects. He participated in several international projects; and led and managed multi-international projects.

Abstract:

The nutrition-health relationship is now well established including risks and benefits associated to the consumption of some foods. Consumers more and more believe that foods contribute directly to their health and seek for natural products to fit their needs. Casein-phosphopeptides (CPP) are phosphorylated casein-derived peptides which possess the ability to affect some biological functions of the body and have the potential applications or to play essential roles in terms of human health e.g. mineral supplementation and bioavailability, bone formation, prevention of osteoporosis and recalcification of bones, cure of anemia, anticariogenic, antimicrobial and immunity enhancement. Casein-phosphopeptides are considered the most favorite bioactive peptides for application as nutraceutical and functional food ingredients for human consumption to provide specific health benefits. This study investigated the presence and characterization of phosphopeptides in semi-hard cheeses and studied the trends of functional food in Egyptian market. The RP-HPLC peptide profiles provide a useful visual representation of the dynamics of peptide production and degradation as proteolysis progressed in cheese ripening. The RP-HPLC patterns of the isolated peptides were complex and dependent on the age of the cheese samples. Regardless the variation in the ages of cheeses tested, the semi-hard cheeses could be ordered descending according to their contents from phosphopeptides as follows: Herrgård cheese>Gouda cheese>Kadett>Västan>Edam>Port Salut. Regarding the phosphopeptides isolated from the semi-hard cheeses, the β-CN fraction was the source of the largest number of phosphopeptides compared to other fractions. In conclusion, it could be recommended that semi-hard cheese, are functional foods at specific age; since, during ripening, several peptides known to be biologically active or containing bioactive sequences as phosphopeptides were formed from the hydrolysis of casein fractions.

J. H. Muyonga

Makerere University, Uganda

Title: Oil and gelatin from Nile perch (Lates niloticus) processing byproducts

Time : 15:00- 15:30

Speaker
Biography:

John Muyonga is a Professor of Food Science and Dean School of Food Technology, Nutrition and Bioengineering at Makerere University. He holds a B.Sc. in Food Science from Makerere University, an M.S. in Food Science from Cornell University and a PhD from University of Pretoria. Prof Muyonga is passionate about research commercialisation and strengthening industry-university linkages. Prof Muyonga’s research covers aspects of food protein chemistry, characterisation of nutraceutical components from foods materials, food lipids and the effect of processing on nutritional and functional properties of foods. Prof is widely published, with over 1200 citations in widely indexed journals.

Abstract:

Nile perch is a major fish species in the East African region, with annual catch estimated at 400,000MT. Approximately 50% of total mass of Nile perch remains as processing byproducts from filleting. Nile perch skins and bones were used for production of gelatin while belly flaps were used for oil extraction.  Highest gelatin yield was obtained from Nile perch skins. Nile perch gelatin was found to contain 21.5% amino acids, which is higher than values reported for temperate fish species. The functional properties of Nile perch gelatins were generally superior to those for commercially available temperate fish species, with skin gelatin generally exhibiting superior functionality to bone gelatin. The properties of Nile perch gelatin were also found to vary with size of fish and these differences were associated with differences in molecular weight distribution. The fatty material yield and oil composition were found to vary with fish size, catch area and season. Nile perch from Lake Victoria had higher fatty material yield and omega-3 fatty acids (FAs) but lower content of vitamin A than that from Lake Albert.  Omega-3 FAs values decreased significantly with increase in fish size. Large fish category had the highest amount of fatty material yield and vitamin A followed by the medium while the small category had the lowest. Organochlorides and heavy metal contamination was generally low. On the whole, Nile perch by products seem potential raw materials for production of gelatin and oil for pharmaceutical, food and other industrial applications.

Speaker
Biography:

Mulugheta T Solomon has recently completed his PhD from University of Foggia. He has done MSc in Organic Agriculture and BSc in Plant Science and is currently looking for Post-doc and Research Positions in the Food and Agricultural Sciences.

Abstract:

The potential of ecological organic agriculture for tropical climate is well documented. Organics respond to the many challenges and opportunities that call for a fresh impetus. Organic food and farming systems have enabled the market for certified organic products to develop and gain a significant foothold in many parts of the world; and are ecologically sound, economically viable, socially just, culturally diverse and transparently accountable. Increasing adoption of organic principles in mainstream agriculture improves global sustainability. Growing the organic sector (certified & non-certified) while making it more sustainable should be the aim. Looking from the best practice agriculture and value chain; it can be seen from different dimensions-ecology, economy, culture, society and accountability; and can observed from several criteria for sustainability. Good governance, consumer needs and health, particularly in the fast changing technology environment and rapid urbanization is needed. Ecological organic agriculture would be the potential system for the future.

 

Pragati Kaushal

Punjab Agricultural University, India

Title: Versatility and utilization of underutilized tropical tuber ‘taro’

Time : 16:00-16:30

Speaker
Biography:

Pragati Kaushal has completed her MTech in Food Engineering and Technology from Sant Longowal Institute of Engineering and Technology, Longowal, Punjab, India. She is a Gold Medalist in MTech, having a teaching experience of more than 4 years as an Assistant Professor (FET Department, SLIET, Longowal, Punjab, India). Currently, she is working as a Teaching Assistant in Food Science and Technology Department, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana, Punjab, India. She has published 14 papers in reputed international journals.

Abstract:

Taro (Colocasia esculenta) being an underutilized tropical tuber widely consumed for its underground corms and cormels. Its richness in high soluble dietary fibre and other components makes this tuber distinguishable from other tubers. Taro is highly digestible which makes this tuber useful for preparing number of food products especially baby foods. Processing makes them digestible and palatable, extends the shelf life and reduces post-harvest losses. Post-harvest losses of around 60% limit its utilization. Processing is the suitable option for extending its uses in various food applications. Another factor that limits its utilization is the acridity present in crystals due to the presence of calcium oxalate. These crystals are released during various unit operations resulting in itchiness, sharp irritation and burning sensation in the throat and mouth on ingestion. Prolonged cooking, fermentation, baking and extraction with ethanol are required for removal of acridity in taro tubers. Anti-nutrients present in taro corms further limits its utilization. Various anti-nutrients present in taro corms are oxalate, phytate, total polyphenol, trypsin inhibitor, etc. This issue is resolved by giving various treatments. Converting this tuber to flour and starch extends its application in various food products. Appropriate attention is required in cases when taro is processed so that its functionality and versatility does not get affected. The use of taro as a food ingredient, in canned products, extruded products, baby foods, etc. has been widely known. Improvements on existing technologies and further value addition can make taro based products more attractive to the consumers.

Break: 16:30-16:45 Coffee Break
Biography:

Amadi E C is working as a Lecturer at the Department of Food Technology, Institute of Management and Technology, Enugu, Nigeria. Her experience includes various programs, contributions and participation in different countries for diverse fields of study. Her research interests reflect in her wide range of publications in various national and international journals.

Abstract:

Yeast (Sacchoromyces cerevisiae) was isolated from the fermenting sap of raffia palm (Raphia hookeri) wine. Different concentrations of the yeast isolate were used to produce bread samples – B, C, D, E, F containing (2, 3, 4, 5, 6)g of yeast isolate respectively, other ingredients were kept constant. Sample A, containing 2 g of commercial baker yeast served as control. The proof heights, weights, volumes and specific volume of the dough and bread samples were determined. The bread samples were also subjected to sensory evaluation using a 9–point hedonic scale. Results showed that proof height increased with increased concentration of the yeast isolate; that is direct proportion. Sample B with the least concentration of the yeast isolate had the least loaf height and volume of 2.80 cm and 200 cm3 respectively but exhibited the highest loaf weight of 205.50 g. However, sample A, (commercial bakers’ yeast) had the highest loaf height and volume of 5.00 cm and 400 cm3 respectively. The sensory evaluation results showed sample D compared favorably with sample A in all the organoleptic attributes-(appearance, taste, crumb texture, crust colour and overall acceptability) tested for (P<0.05). It was recommended that 4 g compressed yeast isolate per 100 g flour could be used to proof dough as a substitute for commercial bakers’ yeast and produce acceptable bread loaves.

S A Adewuyi

Federal University of Agriculture, Nigeria

Title: Determinants of labour productivity of food crop farms in Ogun state, Nigeria

Time : 17:15:17:45

Biography:

Samuel Adewuyi is an Associate Professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics and Farm Management, Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Nigeria. His recent project works include effect of malaria on the productivity of crop farmers in Ogun State, Nigeria. He has attended local and international conferences and published many papers in reputable journals.

Abstract:

This study, examined the determinants of labour productivity of food crop farms in Ogun State, Nigeria. The study data was collected through a multistage random sampling technique from a cross section of 170 food crop farmers and analysed using descriptive budgetary and regression model. The socio-economic data of the respondents were analysed by descriptive statistics and the result revealed that majority (82.4%) of the food crop farmers were male, aged between 41 and 60 years. The mean household size was 4 persons. The mean farm size was 1.8 ha with a mean farming experience of 25 years. The average labour productivity of the farmer stood at 5.19. The coefficient of education and farm size were positive and significantly determine labour productivity at 10% and 1% level of probability respectively. Based on the findings, the study recommended that farmers should cultivate large hectarage of farm land in order to achieve greater labour productivity.

Break: Session Adjournment