Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 11th Global Summit on Food & Beverages Las Vegas, Nevada, USA.

Day 3 :

  • Food Preservation & Quality, Food Borne Diseases
Speaker

Chair

Mevrat Foda

National Research Centre

Speaker

Co-Chair

Vildes Scussel

University of Santa Carina, Brazil

Session Introduction

Bakare H Adegoke

Federal University of Agriculture, Nigeria

Title: Optimization of the cooking conditions on the culinary qualities of pressure cooked boiled yam

Time : 10:05-10:40

Speaker
Biography:

Bakare H Adegoke had his PhD in Food Processing and Preservation from University of Ibadan, Nigeria in 2008. He is a Lecturer in the Department of Hospitality and Tourism, Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta. He has published several articles in reputed journals and is serving at various academic committees.

Abstract:

Yam (Dioscorea rotundata) is consumed in various ways; boiled yam in particular has various culinary applications in Africa but its preparation by conventional cooking consumes time and energy. Pressure cooking offered suitable alternatives but requires careful management of cooking conditions to assure quality. This study optimized cooking condition {thickness of yam slices (1-12 cm), cooking time (5-60 min) and post cooking resident time (2-15 min)} for the pressure boiling of yam slices on their culinary (texture and absorbed water) and sensory (appearance, texture and taste) qualities. Response surface methodology was used for the study with the aid of Design Expert software. Data comparing the proximate and color qualities of the boiled yam from conventional and pressure cooked samples were also analyzed using independent sample T-test. Boiled yam produced at verified optimization solution (3.09 cm, 15.58 min and 3.10 min) compared favorably with that produced by conventional method as there were no significant (p< 0.05) difference in proximate composition (t=0.003, df=12 p=0.4985, one tailed) and color quality (t=0.003, df=12 p=0.4895, one tailed) of pressure cooked and conventionally cooked boiled yam samples.

Speaker
Biography:

Saifaddin Ali is working as a Lecturer at the Saifaddin Ali, Salahaddin University, Iraq. He has extended his valuable service for many years and has been a recipient of many awards and grants. His experience includes various programs, contributions and participation in different events for diverse fields of study. His research interests reflect in his wide range of publications in various national and international journals.

Abstract:

This study was conducted at “Girdarasha” research fields – College of Agriculture/University of Salahaddin-Erbil, during agriculture seasons of (2014 and 2015) in order to investigate effect of nitrogen (mineral and organic) fertilizer and row spacing on growth, yield, yield components and quality characters of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L). The experimental design was split plot design within a complete random block design (RCBD) with three replicates and Duncan test. Where the row spacing was (50 and 70 cm) considered as main plot, while sub plot were seven nitrogen fertilizer levels.

Break: 11:15-11:30 Coffee Break
  • Young Research Forum
Speaker

Chair

Mervat Foda

National Research Centre, Egypt

Speaker

Co-Chair

Vildes Scussel

University of Santa Carina, Brazil

Biography:

Van Tang Nguyen obtained Engineering degree in Food Technology from Hanoi University of Science and Technology. He then received Master’s degree in Food Science from National Taiwan Ocean University, and is doing his PhD in Food Science at University of Newcastle, Australia. He is working as a Lecturer in Food Science and Technology at Nha Trang University and Demonstrator in Food Science at University of Newcastle. His research focuses on natural bioactive compounds, pharmacological activity and functional foods. He published 16 research papers in reputed journals and 3 books in the field of food science and technology.

Abstract:

Phyllanthus amarus (P. amarus) has been used as a traditional herbal plant for the treatment of various diseases, such as hepatitis, diabetes and cancer. Interestingly, P. amarus is rich in phenolics and saponins, it therefore displays potent antioxidant capacity. The aim of this study was to determine optimal microwave-assisted extraction parameters for obtaining the highest saponin content and antioxidant capacity from P. amarus using response surface methodology. The results showed that the optimal microwave-assisted extraction parameters were 100% methanol, irradiation time of 4 s/min, extraction time of 50 min and ratio of solvent to sample of 50 mL/g. Saponin content, saponin extraction efficiency, total phenolic content, ABTS radical scavenging capacity, DPPH radical scavenging capacity and ferric reducing antioxidant power of the P. amarus achieved under these optimal parameters were 227.9 mg escin equivalents (EE)/g dried sample, 82.1%, 39.2 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g dried sample, 484.8, 297.3 and 226.6 mg trolox equivalents (TE)/g dried sample, respectively, which were found to be not significantly different with predicted values (229.5 mg EE/g dried sample, 82.8%, 40.7 mg GAE/g dried sample, 487.3, 330.6 and 233.5 mgTE/g dried sample, respectively). Therefore, the optimal microwave-assisted extraction parameters of 100% methanol, 4 s/min, 50 min and 50 mL/g are recommended for effective extraction of saponins from the P. amarus for potential application in the nutraceutical industry.

Biography:

Aysu Tolun has received her BSc and MSc degrees from Food Engineering Department of Ankara University in 2000 and 2005, respectively. She worked at Quality Control Department of several food industries for 10 years and Ankara University Project Information and Support Unit for 3 years as an expert. She have been pursuing her PhD for four years in the field of Microencapsulation. Zeynep Altintas has worked in Cranfield University (UK) as a faculty member of School of Engineering since 2012 and moved to Berlin Technical University (Germany) in May 2016 upon receiving a very good offer to continue her academic career in Berlin. Nevzat Artik has completed his Doctorate in Ankara University in 1983. From 1994 until now he has been serving as a Professor besides his administrative duties in several institutions includig Minister of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, a member of the National Codex Alimentarius. He served as a Leader in EU project carried out by EFSA. He has a total of 165 publications in the field of Food Science and Technology.

Abstract:

Phenolic compounds obtained from fruits have recently gained a great attention due to their bioactive roles. Grape is one of the world’s largest fruit crops and red grape pomace contains a large amount of phenolic compounds exhibiting wide range of biological effects. Polyphenols can neutralize free radicals turning them into less dangerous, thereby, stopping side reactions. They have positive effects on human health by reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases and acting as potential cancer chemopreventives. However, polyphenols are sensitive and they can be easily affected by physicochemical factors that create a great challenge to be incorporated into food products. Hence, microencapsulation was aimed to investigate in this study to provide a solution for this problem as it offers individual micro-packages consisting of core (phenolics) and coating material for sensitive ingredients to improve their stability and protect them against oxidation, light, moisture and temperature by acting as barrier. The effect of different coating materials, core/coating material ratio and various dying temperatures on the physicochemical properties of microcapsules obtained from grape pomace extract were evaluated. A lab scale spray-dryer was chosen to produce microcapsules of polyphenols using different dextrose equivalents of maltodextrin and gum arabic as alternative coating materials. Two different core/coating material ratios, three different maltodextrin/gum arabic ratios and five different inlet temperatures were investigated. When all parameters including yields, hygroscopicity, total phenolic content, antioxidant activity, individual phenolic compounds were evaluated, the most efficient microcapsules were obtained with a 8:2 ratio of maltodextrin:gum arabic at 140°C inlet temperature.

Kan Takahara

University of Hiroshima, Japan

Title: Effects of low dose of alcohol on DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats

Time : 12:00-12:15

Biography:

Kan Takahara belongs to Laboratory of Molecular Nutrition at University of Hiroshima. He attended to 15th International Nutrition & Diagnostics Conference (INDC 2015) in Prague and The 6th International Conference on Food Factors (ICoFF 2015) in Seoul. His experience includes various programs, contributions and participation in different events for diverse fields of study. His research interests reflect in his wide range of publications in various national and international journals.

Abstract:

Accumulating epidemiological evidence suggests beneficial effect of low dose of alcohol on the development of diseases including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, liver cirrhosis, colon cancer, etc. However, there are very limited animal studies on the effect of low dose of alcohol. Recently, we have reported that low dose of ethanol improves liver function in rats fed a high-fat diet. Furthermore, our studies with senescence-accelerated prone-mice 1 and 2 (SAMP1 and SAMP8) have suggested that low dose of ethanol retards the aging. This study was aimed to investigate effects of low dose of alcohol on DMH-induced rats’ colon cancer. Male F344 rats (5 weeks old) were fed a commercial stock diet for 28 weeks. Ethanol was given with drinking water containing 0.5%, 1% and 2% (v/v) ethanol. Rats were injected 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) once a week for consecutive 8 weeks from 5 weeks of age. The body weight, organ weight and food intake were unaffected by intake of ethanol. Number of adenoma with the colon was lower in the 1% ethanol group compared with the control group and the 2% ethanol group. In addition, intake of 1% ethanol increased colon mRNA of aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 compared to the control group. Our study provides evidence effect of low dose of alcohol on in DMH-induced rats’ colon cancer. Also, aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 may relate to colorectal cancer prevention.

Biography:

Sergio Andrés Cabrera Navarro is an Agro-industrial Engineer and, currently, is pursuing his Master’s degree in Agrofood Science at the University of Tolima, Colombia. He is a Consultant of the nanotechnology and biotechnology line of the Tecnoparque Nodo La Granja-SENA Regional, Tolima. He has researched on bio-compounds, phytochemicals, antioxidants and antimicrobial on natural products. He has published articles related to the antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of the extracts of granadilla (Passiflora ligularis). Currently, he supports the development of innovative prototypes for agro-industrial companies in the Tecnoparque- SENA Tolima, Colombia.

Abstract:

Colombia is one of the countries with the greatest diversity of Passifloraceae with 170 species, both wild and cultivated forms; the majority of these are marketed fresh for its pleasant taste. Studies have shown the medicinal properties of the genus Passiflora, mainly finding that the herbal parts (leaves and flowers) of this genus possess highly effective bioactive and pharmacological properties. The main objective of this research was to evaluate the antioxidant activity and the content of total flavonoids in Passiflora ligularis, Passiflora maliformis and Edulis flavicarpa form. Antioxidant determination was carried out by the free radical scavenging DPPH methodology, expressing the results in terms of the minimum inhibitory concentration IC50 capable of showing minimum content, which reducing by 50% the incidence of radicals. The results showed that the herbal extracts (leaves and flowers) Granadilla cholupa and passion fruit, possess antioxidant activity, mainly finding the lowest inhibitory concentration in aqueous extracts of Granadilla’s leaves 1.88 mg/ml, while the extracts obtained with water from cholupa and maracuya leaves, did not demonstrate to possess sufficient ability to inhibit free radical scavenging activity IC50. Leaf extracts obtained both cholupa and maracuya leaves, showed that increasing the percentage of ethanol (35 and 70%) during the extraction process, the minimum inhibitory concentrations IC50 decreased proportionally, showing that ethanol allows more efficient concentrations and more antioxidant potential. The study was also able to determine higher concentrations of total alkaloids by using extracts with 70% ethanol, mainly found in cholupa’s leaves, high contents of alkaloids; this represents 4.73 mg Eq Harmin/g dry matter. Similarly in extract leaves obtained with 70% ethanol, higher levels of total flavonoids were shown; registering higher contents by using maracuya with values reached 15.44 mg Routine Eq/g dry matter.

Deepak Francis

Ariston School of Business Studies, India

Title: Food processing technology and growth of food & beverage industries in India

Time : 12:30-12:45

Biography:

In the past ten years, India has left no stone unturned to ensure the growth of the Food Processing Industry in India. It has been primarily due to the significance the industry holds as it employs around 19% of the total population with its vital linkages in the key sectors which are agriculture and manufacturing and contributes to around 9% of the GDP.

And while the new global economy ushers in a rapid expansion of the worldwide distribution of agricultural products, my concern now is not only to produce food in sufficient quantity, but also to enhance the competitiveness of the Indian agricultural industry in the world market by developing value-added foods based on higher quality standards and improved processing techniques. The development and promotion of high-quality and value-added agro-products are vital in response to the changing market and consumer preferences amid recent trends in economic development and globalization, as well as the expanding population.

Food processing industry in India is increasingly seen as a potential source for driving the rural economy as it brings about synergy between the consumer, industry and agriculture. A well-developed food processing industry is expected to increase farm gate prices, reduce wastages, ensure value addition, promote crop diversification, generate employment opportunities as well as export earnings. Agro-processing is now regarded as the sunrise sector of the Indian economy in view of its large potential for growth and likely socio economic impact specifically on employment and income generation.

Abstract:

Deepak Francis has completed his Bsc hotel management and catering science at the age of 21 years from kerala University and post graduate studies doing from
Ariston business school. He is working with manipal global and city guilds, an education organization. He had worked in cruise lines as a chef.

Ogunleye Akindele Olamide

Royal Agricultural University, England

Title: Significance of improving storage system to improving future food security

Time : 12:45-13:00

Biography:

Ogunleye Akindele Olamide is currently undergoing his Master’s degree program in Sustainable Agriculture and food Security at the Royal Agricultural University, England. He obtained his Bachelor’s degree at Ladoke Akintola University of Technology where he studied Agricultural Economics and Extension. He is a Member of the Institute of Agricultural Management, United Kingdom and also a Certified Project Manager under the umbrella of the International Project Management Professionals. He worked with the Covenant University farm, Ota in Nigeria which sits on over a thousand hectares of land as a Sales and Record officer.

Abstract:

Most developing countries lose 30% of the food consumed; owing to the fact that these foods are perishable and only 20% of these foods have access to storage this result in postharvest losses of food crops which in turn have an adverse effect on food security (FAO 2009). However, Olaoye et al. (2014) argued that the percentage of food wastage is relative, as it varies from country to country. According to World Bank (2005), food security exists when people at all times have physical and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritional food to meet their dietary needs and preferences for an active and healthy life. To achieve the goal of global food security, Thamaga-Chitja et al. (2004) asserted that among the various sustainability techniques in combating food insecurity such as improved plant varieties, intensification, urban and peri-urban farming among other, the effectiveness of efficient storage system cannot be overemphasized as it plays a significant role in mitigating against post-harvest losses, increasing the availability of food, hunger reduction and contributing significantly towards food security. Furthermore, FAO (2009) added that efficient storage have the potential of increasing farmer’s revenue and improving their livelihoods through the selling of stored farm produce during high demand season by the consumer. Therefore, it is important to give high priority to the improvement of an efficient storage, as this will ensure food availability and reduce the enormity caused by the increasing population. This paper will be focusing on the significance of a storage system within the developed and developing countries and how this can combat food wastage and loss, thereby increasing, and ensuring food availability and sustainability.

Break: Award Ceremony
Session Adjournment