Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 18th Global Summit on Food & Beverages Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Byong Lee

Kangwon National University
South Korea

Keynote: Overproduction of functional food ingredients and biotherapeutics by probiotics and their derived enzymes

Time : 10:30-11:00

Food Summit 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Byong Lee photo
Biography:

Dr. Byong (Byron) Lee received his degrees from the University of British Columbia (Microbiology/Immunology), McGill University (Food Microbiology) and Laval University (Food Biotechnology, PhD, 1980) in Canada. He previously worked as Research Director at Sensient Flavors (Former Champlain Ltd) in Canada (1980-1982), Senior/Principal Scientist and Head of Biotechnology at Food R/D Centre of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) in St-Hyacinthe and Professor (AAFC Chair) in Departments of Microbiology/Immunology and Food Science at McGill University in Montreal, Canada for about 30 years until 2011. Dr. Lee has been Distinguished Professor in School of Biotechnology at Jiangnan University in China (2011-2014), and he is currently Invited Distinguished Professor in Food Science and Biotechnology at Kangwon National University and Advisor at MSC Co, Ltd. in South Korea. Dr. Lee was invited visiting professor in UK (Institute of Food Research/University of Reading), France (INRA/U. de Bourgogne), Ireland (Teagasc Food Research Centre) and Korea (Seoul National University) for 4 years. He has published 207 peer reviewed manuscripts, 3 textbooks on “Food Biotechnology (1st and 2nd Edition in English and Spanish, Wiley, 500 pages)”, 22 book chapters, and 15 patents/inventions. He delivered 115 invited speeches (often as keynote or plenary) at the international conferences, received several awards, and currently serves as the editorial board of seven journals. Dr. Lee supervised more than 100 graduate students, post-docs and others. 

Abstract:

The market of bioactive functional ingredients and biotherapeutics has been increased to US $ 167 billion per year at a 7.3% increase in 2014 and is expected to US $ 279 billion by the end of 2021 (www. transparencymarketresearch.com). The specific components of my research pertain to the molecular and biochemical characterization as well as scale up production of probiotic and fungal recombinant enzymes in order to: (i) produce and demonstrate the suitability of those enzymes derived bioactive compounds as functional food ingredients and biotherapeutics, and (ii) develop health promoting probiotics (anti-cholesterol, anti-cancer, anti-obesity, etc). Among 10 different enzymes were genetically overproduced up to 1,000 folds in different hosts, two recombinant enzymes (lipase and aminopeptidase) have been scaled up to 1,500 liter reactor with excellent performance and reliable results at all scales.

After screening the robust probiotic strains by conventional and metagenomic methodsfive commercial probiotics and their enzymes were developed: (1) cholesterol reducing bile salt hydrolase (BSH) active strain, (2) anti-hypertensive peptide producing and accelerated cheese ripening aminopeptidase active strain, (3) transgalactosyl and hydrolytic lactase producing strains which produce large amounts of galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) and lactose free milk, (4) esterase/lipase active strains which produce a large amount of natural butyric acid (pro drug) and strong esterification (inter- and trans-) activities, and (5) conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) producing strains with anti-obesity and anti-cancer properties. Those applications are immense and some of these data will briefly be presented. 

Break: Networking & Refreshment Break, 11:00-11:20
Food Summit 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Sai Prakash Chaturvedula photo
Biography:

Dr Chaturvedula has an extensive experience in the Organizations of Food/Beverage, CPGs, Natural Ingredients, Nutraceuticals, Dietary Supplements, Health and Wellness Products, Pharmaceutical, and Bio-Technology. Well-known and internationally reputed ‘Subject Matter Expert (SME)’ in the field of ‘Sweeteners and Sweetness Enhancers’ across the Globe with more than 40 patents/applications and over 65 peer reviewed research articles, several book-chapters, review articles and presentations in the area of natural sweeteners like Stevia rebaudiana (Stevia), Luo Han Guo/Siraitia grosvenorii (Monk Fruit) and many other.

Abstract:

The most widely used sweetener in the world is ‘Sucrose’. Several reports indicated that a high daily intake of sucrose develops metabolic disorders and health problems leading to obesity and dental caries; though no specific evidence directly related to diabetes. But high amount of sucrose found to cause weight gain and adverse effects on glucose intolerance. At present, high potency artificial sweeteners are playing a major role in the food and beverage industry worldwide. Recent studies suggest that ‘Stroke and Dementia risk linked to Artificial Sweeteners’ and these findings raised new questions about whether drinks flavored with artificial sweeteners can increase the risk of serious illness, as heavily sugared drinks have already been shown to do!

Due to growing consumer’s desire to control caloric intake more closely as well as potential implications of high potency artificial sweeteners, in recent years, a need for novel natural sweeteners has increased. This leads to the discovery of non-caloric alternative natural sweeteners. Over the past few decades, Stevia rebaudiana leaves have been the source for isolation of a large number of sweet steviol glycosides with varying molecular structures. Steviol glycosides found to possess a sensory characteristic superior to other high potency sweeteners into various food and beverage systems. An overview of ‘Sensory, Nutritional and Health Benefits, Formulation and Product Development of Stevia glycosides isolated from Stevia rebaudiana’ will be discussed

 

Keynote Forum

Klaus W. Lange

University of Regensburg, Germany

Keynote: Food, diet and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

Time : 11:50-12:20

Food Summit 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Klaus W. Lange photo
Biography:

Klaus W. Lange holds the Chair of Biological, Clinical and Neuropsychology at the University of Regensburg, Germany. His main research interests are in the areas of nutrition and physical activity in mental health as well as health psychology and neuropsychology. He is President of the International Movement and Nutrition Society and Editor-in-Chief of Movement and Nutrition in Health and Disease.

Abstract:

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common psychiatric diagnoses in childhood and adolescence and may persist into adulthood. ADHD is characterized by behavioral symptoms such as inattentiveness, hyperactivity and impulsiveness. Medications such as methylphenidate have been shown to yield short-term symptom reduction and other beneficial outcomes in many individuals with ADHD. However, the extent of the efficacy of medication remains a matter of debate. In addition, the long-term pharmacotherapy of ADHD has been shown to have no proven efficacy and to be associated with adverse effects. This highlights the need to find alternative treatment approaches. Growing evidence suggests a significant relationship between quality of diet and mental health. Various nutrients have been linked to brain development and functioning, and diet may be an important factor in the high incidence and prevalence of psychiatric disorders including ADHD. Dietary improvement is therefore thought to be able to assist in the prevention and therapy of ADHD. Major food compounds proposed to be involved in the etiology of ADHD and to have therapeutic efficacy include polyunsaturated fatty acids and micronutrients such as minerals and vitamins. Furthermore, artificial food additives have been suggested to play a role in the etiology of ADHD and elimination diets have been tested for their therapeutic effects. There is currently no clear evidence supporting a role of single nutrients in the etiology and therapy of ADHD. However, the relationship between the whole diet and ADHD may be of greater importance.

Keynote Forum

Cuie Yan

PepsiCo Global Beverages R&D, USA

Keynote: Benefits of low-temperature spray drying technologies on maintaining both flavor integrity and intensity

Time : 12:20-12:50

Food Summit 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Cuie Yan photo
Biography:

Cuie Yan possesses four degrees including a Ph. D. in Polymer Chemistry & Physics, and a recently completed B.S. in Nutrition. She is a Principal Scientist with PepsiCo Global Beverage R&D, with 23 years of technical and management expertise in both industry and academia across Food Science and Biotechnologies. She has authored 32 articles in peer reviewed scientific journals and 2 book chapters; and filed 6 patents and commercialized 2 of them that have been generating $20+ million annual revenue since 2008. She has delivered more than 10 presentations in international conferences and forums; and chaired 6. She also has been a reviewer for 5+ top-ranked scientific journals on Food Science & Biotechnologies; as well as one of the Editorial Board Members for Journal of Biotechnology and Journal of Bio Accent.

Abstract:

Introduction

Flavor remains consumers’ top criterion for choosing foods and beverages. Spray drying is the most widely used method for microencapsulation flavor in the food industry, due to its ease of processing and low operating cost. Conventional spray drying feeds liquid slurry into hot air at 150 to 220 0C to remove water, thus flavor loss and oxidation are inevitable during the drying process. Maintaining flavor intensity and integrity during spray drying has been a substantial challenge in the food industry. Low-temperature spray drying technologies may reduce flavor loss and oxidation.

Methods

Three low-temperature spray drying technologies—spray cooling, spray freeze drying, and supercritical CO2 spray drying—were investigated and compared with conventional spray drying technology in parallel. Size and surface morphology of flavor microcapsules were observed by SEM. Flavor loading level, encapsulation efficiency and wet delivery capacity were measured by GC-MS and APCI-MS. Flavor intensity and integrity were evaluated by sensory using potato chips as matrix.

Results and Discussion

Based on the same flavor microencapsulation formulation, supercritical CO2 spray drying shows the highest flavor loading capacity, while maintaining the highest flavor integrity among the three technologies. Spray cooling maintains flavor integrity well, with the slowest flavor release. But spray freeze drying generates a porous structure that can’t hold flavor well. Low temperature spray drying technologies, particularly supercritical CO2 spray drying and spray cooling, offer superior capability of loading and preserving flavor, compare to conventional spray drying.

Conclusion

Low-temperature spray drying technologies, particularly supercritical CO2 spray drying and spray cooling, offer superior capability of loading and preserving flavor, compared to conventional spray drying. This finding will enable the food industry to maximize flavor usage in both snacks and beverages, to save cost. 

Break: Group Photo
Lunch Break 13:00-13:45

Keynote Forum

Michael Cherney

Load Delivered, USA

Keynote: Food Logistics & Distribution

Time : 13:45-14:15

Food Summit 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Michael Cherney photo
Biography:

Michael Cherney has been involved in transportation management in a number of different capacities over the past 8 years. He is an integral part of Load Delivered’s growth. His expertise in supply chain efficiency and network implementation has been a catalyst of his growth within the industry. His educational background is in Economics; however, he is in the process of earning his Masters of Science in Global Supply Chain Management from USC’s Marshall School of Business. Michael’s strengths are in leadership, process improvement, S&OP, contract negotiations and execution. He has a customer first mentality with the focus of finding mutually beneficial partnerships. 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Transportation is a key component to any supply chain. Specifically, in the Food and Beverage industry, with new regulations in place for Food Safety and driver’s hours, a lean supply chain with a comprehensive and robust transportation network able to scale with the necessary agility to meet quality and service standards.  is as critical as ever. Companies in this space are faced with the task of understanding these new regulations and the impact they will have on their supply chain forcing them to analyze their supply chain and transportation network. Will they determine to adjust internal S&OP? Will they pass the burden along to their suppliers and implement VMI? Will they source locally? Build smaller regional facilities to lower total cost of transportation? Are they ready to handle the changes? Etc. Will these changes help compete with Amazon? These are a few of the challenges companies in the Food and Beverage space are faced with when it comes to logistics and distribution. There is no one-size-fits-all solution, however there are ways to be best prepared to take their supply chain to the next level without issue during this time of change. 

  • Workshop

Session Introduction

Hami Alpas

Middle East Technical University, Turkey

Title: Non-thermal Processing in Food Industry: Modeling, Food Safety and Consumer Acceptance

Time : 14:15-15:00

Speaker
Biography:

Prof. Dr. Hami Alpas served as a “visiting scholar” in 1996 and 1998 at University of Wyoming, USA; as a “visiting scientist” in 2001 and 2002 at Ohio State University, USA and as a “visiting professor” in 2006, 2007 and 2008 at University of Bordeaux I, France. His main research areas are: Unit Operations in Food Engineering, Non-thermal Food Processing Technologies, Food Quality, Food Safety and Food Security through Total Food Protection. He is an expert in High Hydrostatic Pressure treatment of foods. He has supervised 5 Ph. D and 12 M.Sc. theses. He has 76 international journal articles (SCI) and over 1000 citations (ISI-Web of Sci. h-factor 20) as well as close to 60 academic presentations in 40 different international meetings. He has completed 15 national, 4 international projects including EU/JRC, CNRS-EGIDE and NATO ARW/ATC, EU-FP7 projects. He has authored 10 chapters in internationally edited books and has edited 3 international books by Springer. http://fde.metu.edu.tr/prof-hami-alpas

Abstract:

Today’s mainstream food preservation methods mostly depend on two dimensions- namely time and temperature and have several drawbacks. The use of heat (pasteurization, sterilization and blanching, etc.) can destroy nutrients such as thermally labile vitamins and also components responsible from product flavor and taste. It can also produce some undesirable compounds originated from Maillard reaction and caramelization. All of these changes result in products that are far from being original. This contradicts with modern consumers’ desire for the fresh and natural food products bringing the need for alternative non-thermal processing methods. Among these High Hydrostatic Pressure (HHP), has been recently branded-patented as “Pascalization”. Its main difference from conventional thermal processing is the addition of the third variable-pressure- in addition to lower heat / shorter time combination with respect to traditional thermal treatment making it a 3-D process. The process is fast, safe, effective and globally producing food-edible products without any additives or preservatives ranging from meat-dairy-seafood-deli to fruit/vegetable juices and even pet food. HHP technology has been also quoted as being one of the best innovations in food processing in the last fifty years. The pros and cons of this technology with recent applications in modeling with food safety requirements and consumer acceptance will be summarized together with the current facts and myths.

  • Oral Session
Speaker

Chair

Hami Alpas

Middle East Technical University, Turkey

Speaker

Co-Chair

Isabel M.P.L.V.O. Ferreira

Universidade do Porto, Portugal

Session Introduction

Sejong Oh

Chonnam National University, South Korea

Title: Animal-origin Probiotics vs Plant-origin Probiotics

Time : 15:00-15:20

Speaker
Biography:

 
Dr Sejong Oh earned his BSc degree from Korea University and his PhD majoring in Dairy Chemistry & Biotechnology from Korea University as well. He joined the R & D Center of Korea Yakult Co. Ltd in 1990. In 1998, Dr Sejong Oh has worked for the New York State Experimental Station in the Department of Food Science & Technology, Cornell University. In 2003 Dr Sejong Oh was appointed to the Division of Animal Science, Chonnam National University as a professor and he served as vice Dean of Agriculture and Life Science, Chonnam National University since 2016. From 2008 to 2015, he was working as a Visiting Scientist at the Canadian Research Institute for Food Safety, University of Guelph. His current research interests include factors of controlling growth and survival of microorganisms in foods; beneficial uses of microorganisms; and applications of bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria. Dr Sejong Oh has authored more than 100 peer-reviewed publications, five book chapters (3 Korean and 3 English) and 35 patents including 2 US patents. He is also an Editor-in-Chief at the Journal of Milk Science & Biotechnology, and the Korean Journal for Food Science of Animal Resources, and the Current Topics in Lactic Acid Bacteria and Probiotics. Dr Sejong Oh is currently a member of the American Society for Microbiology, the American Dairy Science Association, the Institute of Food Technologists, and the Microbiological Society of Korea. 

Abstract:

At the beginning of the 20th century, Ellie Metchnikoff (1845–1916), Ernest Moro (1874–1951), and Leo Rettger (1874–1954) made their first scientific contributions to the research on probiotics. In humans, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have a strong influence on the host’s health because LAB are an important biodefense factor for preventing colonization by and subsequent proliferation of pathogenic bacteria in the intestine. Probiotics is largely used for the production of fermented products of animal (dairy) and plant origin. Recently, fruit or vegetable products containing probiotics are preferred by some consumers. In the formulation of fruit or vegetable probiotic products, Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. casei, L. plantarum, L. rhamnosus and Bifidobacterium lactis are most utilized. European, American and Asian (especially in Japan and South Korea) markets already commonly sell probiotic products from fruits and vegetables. Lactobacillus plantarum, as a heterogeneous and versatile species that is encountered in a variety of environmental niches, including fermented food products, such as dairy, meat, fish, and vegetables, as well as plant matter. This species exhibits various biological effects such as antitumor, anticoagulant, antiviral, immune modulatory and anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, and anti-oxidant or free radical scavenging activity. My research group discovered that L. plantarum strains isolated from kimchi and infant feces. These strains have a high survival rate in low pH conditions. Proteins isolated from L. plantarum L67 could stimulate the apoptotic signals and then consequently induce programmed cell death in HT-29 cells. The results in this study suggest that L. plantarum L67 could be used as a probiotic culture for the production of dairy or vegetable fermented foods. Some companies insist that plant origin-probiotics are superior than animal-origin probiotics without any scientific data that supports the claim. How are plant proteins much better than animal proteins for human health? Simple answer is that it is not.

Monika Dykas

Global Food Banking Network, USA

Title: What is food banking: General overview

Time : 15:20-15:40

Speaker
Biography:

Monica Dykas is working as a Network Programs Officer at The Global Food Banking Network, USA. She also served as a Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation Officer at Heifer International Perú, Peru and Project Coordinator at Power Mundo, USA.

Abstract:

This session will provide an overview of the problems of food waste and hunger on a global scale and how food banking is one of the key solutions to solving both of these problems. The Global FoodBanking Network (GFN) is a non-profit organization that helps to develop and support food banks around the world, outside the U.S. Through its peer network of food bank leaders and its expert staff, GFN provides food banks with the resources and know-how needed to better serve those facing hunger in their local communities. GFN’s network is the steadfast foundation for food bank organizations to evolve, thrive, and fulfill their mission to reduce hunger in their locality.

Thu-Ha Nguyen

BOKU - University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Austria

Title: Microbial production of prebiotic oligosaccharides: Galacto-oligosaccharides as an example

Time : 15:40-16:00

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Thu-Ha Nguyen obtained her degrees from TU Delft in the Netherlands (Biochemical Engineering, MSc, 2002) and BOKU - University of Natural Resources and Life Science in Vienna, Austria (Food Biotechnology, PhD, 2006). She has been working at the Food Biotechnology Laboratory at BOKU Vienna as post-doc, senior post-doc and later as scientific researcher. She is currently a beneficiary of an Elise-Richter-Grant of the Austrian Science Fund FWF for highly qualified female scientists and scholars. Her research focuses on biotechnologically relevant enzymes from lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria and their application in biotransformations and biocatalysis as well as on protein expression, secretion and anchoring. She (co-) authored more than 35 peer-reviewed papers and several book chapters.

Abstract:

Prebiotic oligosaccharides have attracted an increasing amount of attention because of their physiological importance and functional effects on human health, as well as their physico-chemical properties, which are of interest for various applications in the food industries. Galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS), one of the major groups of prebiotic oligosaccharides, are formed via the transgalactosylation reaction from lactose. This reaction is catalyzed by a number of b-galactosidases (lactases) in addition to their hydrolytic activity. GOS are complex mixtures of different oligosaccharides, and the spectrum of the oligosaccharides making up these mixtures strongly depends on the source of the enzyme used for the biocatalytic reaction as well as on the conversion conditions used in their production. These oligosaccharides are of great interest because of their proven prebiotic characteristics. A plethora of GOS is also found in human milk, and these differently substituted oligosaccharides are associated with a number of beneficial effects for the breast-fed infant.

Break: Networking & Refreshment Break 16:00-16:20
Speaker
Biography:

M A K K P Perera has her expertise in the field of Water and Food Safety and Quality. Her investigation on food losses and waste is based on literature and her knowledge on food chemistry, analytical chemistry, food quality management and 18 years of experience in food quality control. She has identified range of causes and prevention methods of food losses. All findings of this study are based on literature and her 18 years of experience in the field of Food Safety and Quality.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: About 1.3 billion tons of foods are wasted every year worldwide. That means roughly one third of food produced for human consumption is lost or wasted globally. This enormous wastage exists at the same time as one billion people in the world are suffering and dying from hunger. Food is lost or wasted throughout the food supply chain (FSC) from initial agricultural production down to final household consumption. Food loss and waste have many negative ecological, economic, ethical and cultural impacts. Food losses represent a waste of resources used in production such as land, water, energy and inputs. Producing food that will not be consumed leads to unnecessary CO2 emission in addition to loss of economic value of the food produced. Ultimately, using up further resources for its management. The purpose of this study is to identify the extent, causes and prevention of global food losses and waste.
Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: A literature review is carried out to identify causes and prevention of food losses and waste. 
Findings: Food is lost or wasted throughout the food supply chain (FSC) from initial agricultural production down to final household consumption. On a per capita basis, much more food is wasted by consumers in developed countries (Europe, North America, Oceania and Industrialized Asia) than in developing countries (Sub-Sahara Africa; North Africa, West and Central Africa; South and Southeast Asia; Latin America). According to the literature, in developed countries food is to great extent wasted at the consumption level, meaning that it is thrown away even if it is still suitable for human consumption. Significant food loss and waste however, also occur at the early stages of FSC. This is mainly related to consumer behaviour as well as lack of coordination between different actors in the food supply chain. Also due to quality standards, which reject food items not compiled to it still taste and nutritional value are not affected. Insufficient purchase planning, confusing about "best before" and "use by" date and careless attitude of those consumers who can afford to waste food. This waste in developed countries can be reduced by raising awareness among food industries, retailers and consumers and finding out good and beneficial use for safe food that is presently discarded. In developing countries, food is lost mostly during the early and middle stages of the FSC and much less at the consumer level. The causes of food losses and waste mainly connected to financial, managerial and technical limitations in harvesting techniques, storage and cooling facilities in hot climate conditions, infrastructures, packaging and marketing systems. Food losses in those countries can be reduced by investing in infrastructure, transportation, food industries and packaging industries and strengthening the FSC by encouraging small formers to organize and to diversify and upscale their production and marketing.
Conclusion & Significance: 
Food security is major concern in large part of the developing world. Food production must increase significantly to meet the future demand of an increasing world population. Promotion of the reduction of food losses and waste has a considerable potential to increase the efficiency of whole FSC. In the world, with limited natural resources (land, water, energy, fertilizer etc.) reduction of food losses plays a major role in finding of   cost-effective solutions to produce enough safe and nutritious food for all. In developing countries, solution should be made at producer level (e.g. investment in infrastructure and transportation) while in developed countries, it should be made at the consumer level (e.g. need to informed and change the behavior which causes the current high level of food waste

Monika Dykas

Global Food Banking Network, USA

Title: Case studies on innovation in food banking

Time : 16:40-17:00

Speaker
Biography:

Monica Dykas is working as a Network Programs Officer at The Global Food Banking Network, USA. She also served as a Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation Officer at Heifer International Perú, Peru and Project Coordinator at Power Mundo, USA.

Abstract:

This session will go into a few case studies from around the world on how food banks are developing innovative methods to rescue more food before it is wasted and distribute it to those most in need. Additionally, information will be provided on food banks’ shifting focus towards nutrition and creative programs that food banks have developed through public-private partnerships to provide nutritious foods to their clients. 

Break: Session Adjournment