Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 18th Global Summit on Food & Beverages Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Satya Prakash

McGill University, Canada

Keynote: TBA

Time : 10:10-10:40

Food Summit 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Satya Prakash photo
Biography:

Satya Prakash works at Biomedical Technology and Cell Therapy Research Laboratory in the department of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, Canada. The primary research interest of this laboratory is in several innovative areas of artificial cells, microencapsulation, cell therapy, tissue engineering, nanomedicine, regenerative medicine, biomaterials, drug delivery, bacterial cell therapy, medical device engineering, and other biomedical technology developments. Specifically, the research team is investigating cholesterol lowering formulations, fatty liver therapeutics, therapeutic protein delivery, novel therapies for neurodegenerative diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, wound healing, and formulations for use in colon and breast cancers. The research team is also investigating basic mechanisms for the design of artificial organ substitutes such as artificial kidney, liver and skin. 

Abstract:

TBA

Break: Networking & Refreshment break, 10:40-11:00
Food Summit 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Hami Alpas photo
Biography:

Prof. Dr. Hami Alpas served as a “visiting scholar” in 1996 and 1998 at University of Wyoming, USA; as a “visiting scientist” in 2001 and 2002 at Ohio State University, USA and as a “visiting professor” in 2006, 2007 and 2008 at University of Bordeaux I, France. His main research areas are: Unit Operations in Food Engineering, Non-thermal Food Processing Technologies, Food Quality, Food Safety and Food Security through Total Food Protection. He is an expert in High Hydrostatic Pressure treatment of foods. He has supervised 5 Ph. D and 12 M.Sc. theses. He has 76 international journal articles (SCI) and over 1000 citations (ISI-Web of Sci. h-factor 20) as well as close to 60 academic presentations in 40 different international meetings. He has completed 15 national, 4 international projects including EU/JRC, CNRS-EGIDE and NATO ARW/ATC, EU-FP7 projects. He has authored 10 chapters in internationally edited books and has edited 3 international books by Springer. http://fde.metu.edu.tr/prof-hami-alpas

Abstract:

Effect of HHP processing (200, 300, 400 MPa; 5, 15, 25⁰C; 5 and 10 minutes) against traditional thermal treatment at 85⁰C/10 min on antioxidant activity, total phenolic content, total monomeric anthocyanin concentration, ascorbic acid content, mannitol content, color values (ΔE) as well as total mesophilic aerobic bacteria (TMAB) and total yeast and mold (TYM) in freshly squeezed pomegranate juice was investigated. HHP combinations around 400 MPa at 10 min at every temperature studied was sufficient to decrease TMAB and TYM counts more than 4.0 log cycles proving microbial stability and safety. Additionally, HHP showed no significant decrease in antioxidant activity, total phenolic content and monomeric anthocyanin pigment concentrations of the freshly squeezed juices while there was a significant decrease (p < 0.05) in conventional thermal treated (at 85⁰C/10 min) ones. In shelf life study HHP treatments extended the storage period up to 30 days at 4⁰C with stable antioxidant and ascorbic acid levels and higher sensory approval in terms of odor and appearance over pasteurized samples. These results provide information of storage stability of pomegranate juice after pressure treatments which is quite scarce. In database collected, criteria for commercial production of high quality, healthy pomegranate juice with safety requirements could be established. 
 

Food Summit 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Isabel M.P.L.V.O. Ferreira  photo
Biography:

Isabel M.P.L.V.O. Ferreira is Professor at University of Porto – Faculty of Pharmacy and coordinator of Food Quality and Safety research line at LAQV/REQUIMTE. Specialization: Food quality and safety, development and validation of GC and HPLC methods for analyses of nutrients and contaminants. Find new applications for brewing and agroindustry by-products, development of new functional foods. H-Index 30, published 148 indexed articles and 8 chapters.  Supervised 8 PhD thesis, 24 MsD thesis and 5 Post-Doc.  

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: By-products (BP) generated from food industry usually present, per se, insufficient biological stability, high water content, and high enzymatic activity. However, if appropriate stabilization and extraction procedures are performed they can be interesting substrates to obtain functional food ingredients. Nevertheless, the impact on those ingredients enriched in dietary fiber and minerals must be evaluated since naturally occurring compounds may decrease mineral bioaccessibility. The purpose of this study was to characterize the fiber rich extracts obtained from different BP and evaluate their impact on total and bioaccessible mineral composition of wheat bread. Materials & Methodology: Extracts from orange peel (OE); pomegranate peel and interior membranes (PE); elderberry skin, pulp and seeds (EE); and spent yeast (YE) prepared as summarized in Figure 1 were used for bread fortification. Total Dietary Fiber (TDF) and Insoluble Dietary Fiber (IDF) contents were analyzed by commercial kits (K-TDFR, Megazyme, Cork, Ireland). Minerals were analyzed using an iCAP Q ICP-MS (Thermo Fisher Scientific, Bremen, Germany). Findings: Fortified wheat breads were eligible for the nutritional claim “source of fiber” (≥ 3 g TDF/100 g bread, fresh weight). Wheat bread fortification with OE, EE, and PE improved the content of essential minerals when compared with control bread. Only bread fortified with YE presented a mineral content similar to control bread, but its mineral bioaccessibility was significantly higher than in all the other bread formulations. The opposite was observed for PE bread. Conclusion & Significance: Fortified wheat breads claimed as “source of fiber” were produced using fiber/mineral enriched ingredients from BP. The nature of the fiber rich extract may have a strong negative impact on minerals bioaccessibility, thus it must be carefully selected. BP valorization provides new solutions for environment concerns associated with BP disposal and may contribute to indirect income generation. 

Keynote Forum

Carla Vartanian

American Overseas Dietetic Association, Lebanon

Keynote: Food Labeling: Understanding and Using the Nutrition Facts

Time : 12:00-12:30

Food Summit 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Carla Vartanian photo
Biography:

Carla Vartanian is certified in Clinical Bioethics from Harvard Medical School. She has a Masters in Nutrition from the American University of Beirut and the European Espen Diploma of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. She is the Public Relation Chair of the American Overseas Dietetic Association and has nutrition and health awareness TV show in Lebanon. Carla has participated in many international scientific meetings, been teaching in different universities in Lebanon and published health articles in the Middle East. She is an active member of many international nutrition associations around the world.

Abstract:

Labeling, the most important marketing tool for a product is considered an important process in the food processing chain and should not be overlooked. A label is the first point of contact between a consumer and the producer and is used to identify one product from another and help consumers make wise choices over which product to purchase. Labels should be attractive, appealing and eye catching while at the same time being informative. A confused, untidy label will not help to sell a product. Small-scale food processors should aim to label their products with the best label they can obtain or afford in relation to the value of the product. The purpose of a food label is mainly to inform the consumers about the product, advertise the product and help distinguish the product from that of competitors. Good nutrition is a vital part of leading a healthy lifestyle. Combined with physical activity, eating a well balanced diet can help to reach and maintain a healthy weight thus nutrition information on food labels is an important source of nutrition information but is typically underutilized by consumers. Relatively few studies investigated knowledge effects on the use of ingredient lists and claims, compared to nutrition facts labels. Future research should aim to investigate which part of nutrition knowledge will be the most critical to food label use and dietary decision making in addition to determining whether increases in nutrition knowledge can promote great use of nutrition information on food labels

  • Special Session

Session Introduction

Alexander Gosslau

The City University of New York, USA

Title: Effects of two natural enriched plant extracts against type 2 diabetes

Time : 12:30-13:00

Speaker
Biography:

Alexander Gosslau has more than 18 years experience in Cell and Molecular Biology in academia and industry in the US and Europe. Appointed in 2017 as Associate Professor at the Dept. of Science (Biology), City University of New York, BMCC. Since 2009 also serving as a Visiting Professor in the Dept. of Chemical Biology of Rutgers University. Prior appointments as Research Assistant Professor at Rutgers University (2006 - 2009) and Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Bremen in Germany and University of Stavanger in Norway. Received Ph.D. from the University of Bremen, Germany, and Master's degree from the Universities of Oldenburg and Goettingen, Germany. As Head of Cell and Molecular Biology at WellGen, Inc. leadership roles in research & development and project management in the field of molecular medicine, medicinal food, inflammation, and cancer research for 12 years. In 2013, appointed as Associate Editor-in-Chief of Food Science and Human Wellness (Elsevier). In 2017, Editorial Board Member of Movement and Nutrition in Health and Disease. Reviewer for various international journals. Published research manuscripts and reviews in top tier, peer-reviewed journals, patent applications and many presentations in international academic and corporate meetings. Collaborations with various academic institutions, various professional memberships. Raised over $3 MM from government and corporate fundings to support research.

Abstract:

There is mounting evidence that chronic inflammation in type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a leading cause of the progression of the disease. T2D is linked to aging and obesity, also occurring at epidemic rates worldwide, causing chronic low-grade inflammation through macrophage infiltration thus contributing to T2D. Complications of T2D resulting from low-grade inflammation are related to chronic hyperglycemia and its induced formation of advanced glycation end products (AGE) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The activation of transcription factor NFkB leads to transcription of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and adipokines which exacerbates this pathological state by positive feedback mechanism leading to cell damage and organ pathology such as nephropathy, cardiovascular disease, retinopathy and neuropathy. Current therapies against diabetes involve control of glucose or insulin resistance (e.g. metformin, pioglitazone) and pharmacological anti-inflammatory regimens (e.g. aspirin, ibuprofen) designed to target specific steps in the inflammation cascade. Current drugs have well known side effects, particularly GI and cardiovascular side effects that are likely to be prohibitive for chronic use. Consequently, natural compounds or extracts effective against T2D with potentially lesser side effects may be advantageous for long-term therapy. We developed an enriched black tea extract and orange peel extract which showed strong anti-inflammatory effects at an early stage in the inflammatory cascade as demonstrated throughout cell-based in vitro, animal in vivo as well as in human pilot studies. Anti-diabetic regimens affecting different pathways as promising strategy against type 2 diabetes are discussed.

Break: Lunch Break 13:00-13:45

Klaus W. Lange

University of Regensburg, Germany

Title: Gluten-free and casein-free diets and the treatment of autism

Time : 13:45-14:15

Speaker
Biography:

Klaus W. Lange holds the Chair of Biological, Clinical and Neuropsychology at the University of Regensburg, Germany. His main research interests are in the areas of nutrition and physical activity in mental health as well as health psychology and neuropsychology. He is President of the International Movement and Nutrition Society and Editor-in-Chief of Movement and Nutrition in Health and Disease.

Abstract:

Autism is a complex psychiatric disorder characterized by impairments in social interaction, restricted patterns of behavior and impairments in communication. In the framework of the “opioid excess theory”, these symptoms have been likened to the behavioral effects of opiates. A possible dietary basis of autism has been proposed, hypothesizing that certain food proteins such as gluten and casein can be transformed to opioid peptides during digestion. These peptides might eventually be able to enter the blood stream and act upon the central nervous system. As a consequence, a diet low in such proteins has been hypothesized to ameliorate the behavioral symptoms of children with autism. More than 80 % of parents of children with autism spectrum disorder reported some kind of dietary intervention for their child (gluten-free and casein-free (GFCF) diet in 29 %). The majority of studies evaluating GFCF diet outcomes failed to meet basic methodological standards of interventional science. Comparison of study results did not show any clear-cut results, with a substantial proportion of studies failing to show any positive dietary effect. The results of more sophisticated trials were far from equivocal and the studies differed in many methodological aspects. Some variables such as information source and trial duration seemed to affect outcome. Evidence of the effectiveness of the GFCF diet in the treatment of autism is sparse. Rigorous scientific evaluations partly failed to confirm therapeutic effects of the GFCF diet. These and other negative results related to the opioid excess theory weaken the underlying rationale for GFCF diet use. Nevertheless, more sophisticated investigations should be conducted in order to identify possible benefits and harms of such a dietary approach. At present a gluten-free and casein-free diet should only be administered if an allergy or intolerance to nutritional gluten or casein is diagnosed.

Speaker
Biography:

Olivia Maria de Castro Pinho is researcher from LAQV/REQUIMTE and Full Professor at the Faculty of Nutrition and Food Science from the University of Porto.  Expertise: Food Safety. Development and optimisation of chemical and biochemical methodologies to be applied to nutrients. Improvement of food manufacturing processes and cooking to promote consumer’s health.  As nutritionist she has also experience in studies related with food consumption habits. (http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9477-8638)

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: There is a growing interest in the incorporation of functional ingredients on bread to reply consumer’s demands on healthy nutrition. The fiber enrichment of bread is an interesting possibility due to health benefits associated with increase of fiber intake. Potential sources of dietary fiber are agroindustry by-products, such as orange, pomegranate, elderberry peels and spent yeast. However, fiber enrichment of bread may compromise its organoleptic characteristics.  Therefore, the major goal of this study is to select the concentrations of fiber rich extracts with best acceptance by consumers and understand the relationships between sensory and instrumental data. Materials & Methodology: Nine different bread formulations were produced with addition of fiber extracts (% wheat flour): elderberry (5.0%, 7.0%, 10.0%), orange (2.5%, 7.0), pomegranate (5.0%, 7.0%, 10.0%), yeast (2.5%). For control (C) bread no extract was added. A sensory panel composed by 13 members was trained for descriptive analysis according to the guidelines in the ISO 8586 (2012). Sensory acceptability tests were carried out, with 60 non-trained members. Statistical models for sensory preference evaluation and correlation with color and crumb structure were developed. Findings: External preference mapping indicated consumer preferences and enabled selection of the concentrations of fibre with best acceptance, namely 7.0% elderberry, 2.5% orange, 5.0% pomegranate, and 2.5% yeast. Data collected from image analysis complemented sensory profile information, whereas multivariate PLS regression provided information on the relationship between sensory and instrumental data. Regression models developed presented good fitting (R2Y > 0.700) and predictive ability (Q2 > 0.500). Conclusion & Significance: The results of the present study indicate that fiber extracts obtained from orange, pomegranate, elderberry peels, interior membranes and seeds and spent yeast have potential application as bread ingredients. However, the concentrations of each fiber rich extracts with best acceptance by consumers must be carefully selected.

  • Oral Session II
Speaker

Chair

Byong Lee

Kangwon National University, South Korea

Speaker

Co-Chair

Cuie Yan

Global Pepsico R&D, USA

Session Introduction

Junrong Huang

Shaanxi University of Science and Technology, China

Title: The hierarchical structure and properties of starches

Time : 14:45-15:05

Speaker
Biography:

Junrong Huang is a professor working in School of Food and Biological Engineering, Shaanxi University of Science and Technology, China. She received her PhD degree from Jiangnan University (China) and Wageningen University (The Netherlands). Her research work is focused on the physical, chemical, and nutritional properties of starches; architecture of granules, and molecular structure of starches; and was/is supported by grants from National Natural Science Foundation of China, and several food companies. A method for revealing and obtaining outer shells and inner blocklets of starch granules was established; and starch gelatinization (industrially important process) was described on the blocklet level by her group for the first time.

Abstract:

Starch is a polymeric carbohydrate, contained in large amounts in staple foods. In industry, it is converted into sugars or used as a thickening, stiffening or gluing agent. The two major macromolecular components of starch are amylose and amylopectin. With a molecular weight ranging from 50–500×106, amylopectin is one of the largest natural polymers known. Similar to protein, starch is a hierarchical material and can be divided into four levels of structure: molecule, blocklet, shell and granule. The molecule structure is related to the digestive and rheological properties of starch. The shell, especially the outer shell structure, is a key factor in determining the swelling and pasting properties during starch gelatinization. The granule structure is related to the crystalline and thermal properties of starch. The blocklet is the building block of the shell and the granule, however, little is known about its relationship with the properties of starch. A method to slow down or interrupt the gelatinization process of starch was established. By applying the method, a new phenomenon was observed for the gelatinization process of starch at the blocklet level: the blocklets were released from the granules; swelled; deformed to olive shape, and formed bead-like structure; then fused together with completely disappearing of the shape, and formed the gel network in the end.

Tony Mutukumira

Massey Institute of Food Science & Technology, New Zealand

Title: Development of wheat bread and gluten-free bread formulations containing Mozuku (Chordaria cladosiphon)

Time : 15:05-15:25

Speaker
Biography:

After gaining a PhD in Food Science and Technology at the Norwegian University of Life Sciences (Norway), Dr Tony Mutukumira has been working on food product development, food safety and preservation, food fermentations and processing. Tony has particular interest in the use of natural bioactives in consumer foods and their potential in preservation. The present work describes the potential of adding brown seaweed into bakery products. Tony is a scientific reviewer for several international peer-reviewed journals and a member of several renowned professional bodies.

Abstract:

Many seaweeds such as Chordaria cladosiphon, commonly known as mozuku, contain several health promoting components such as dietary fibre, antioxidants, and a range of bioactive compounds. Mozuku, an edible brown seaweed constitutes an important part of the diet of native Okinawans who enjoy long lives and consume the seaweed mixed with various seafoods and vegetables. Brown seaweeds and their isolated compounds, specifically a long-chain polysaccharide known as fucoidan, are reported to retard the formation and growth of various cancer cells in humans as well as having anticoagulation, antiviral and immunological activities. The present study developed wheat and gluten-free bread formulations containing mozuku powder aimed at introducing its potential health benefits to a wider consumer base through bread, a staple food product. In this study, wheat bread and gluten-free bread containing variable levels of mozuku powder were successfully developed. Wheat bread samples containing up to 2% mozuku powder were well-accepted by consumer sensory panelists. Whereas, gluten-free bread containing 2.5% mozuku was well-liked by consumer sensory panelists.

Speaker
Biography:

Refia Gulin Ogut Eker is an Associate Professor at the Faculty of Literature, Department of Turkish Folklore, Hacettepe University, Turkey

Abstract:

In terms of the modern city man, is tradition a dystopian value for the future or a utopian value that is sustained in the past that is not needed today? Modern people who do not share the same cultural memory and do not feed on this memory can not prepare perceptions based on the historical roots of the future and genetic cultural codes. Modernization, which is not based on tradition, brings together historical and social alienation. In this context, “food culture” is one of the most effective areas where tradition is conveyed in a traditionally marketed platform for delivering the desired message to the target group. Food is a coding system that is directly related to the religious, cultural, social, economic and geographical characteristics of the society in which a person lives, as well as being a biological imperative stemming from the basic needs of the human body such as surviving, leading a healthy life, reproduction. In this study, the sustainability of traditional food production will be covered through “Food Culture” and “Traditional Farming”, the main fields of the Turkish Folklore discipline, with the perspective of modern people’s needs and the world of consumption. The data on the traditional food items and productions which is scanned from the food epics and from the old Turkish Inscriptions such as Kutadgu Bilig, Compendium of the Turkic Dialects and Book of Dede Korkut will be analyzed with the Functional Folklore Method and the map of the food items coded in the Turkish cultural memory will be created. In this research which aims to maintain the production and consumption of traditional food in the modern world, an evaluation will be made on Turkish food memory. Another objective of this declaration is to present the enforcement of the proposals on the issue of sustainability of food production such as organizing certificated courses on organic agriculture in the regional directorates of agriculture, introducing organic farming certificate requirement to farmers, tax reduction of organic agriculture incentive tax, ease of payment, cheap seeds/ fertilizers, market sales facilities. In accordance with the data derived from the written and traditional knowledge about food culture, the state of tradition which is the ruling power of the past and the future will be subjected to the cultural texture analysis in the modern world’s food production.

Pragati Menon

Punjab Agricultural University, India

Title: Non thermal techniques in food processing and preservation

Time : 15:45-16:05

Speaker
Biography:

Pragati Kaushal has completed her M. Tech in Food Engineering and Technology from Sant Longowal Institute of Engineering and Technology, Longowal, Punjab, India. She is a Gold Medalist in M. Tech, having a teaching experience of more than 5 years as an Assistant Professor (FET Department, SLIET, Longowal, Punjab, India). Currently, she is working as a Teaching Assistant in Food Science and Technology Department, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana, Punjab, India. She has published 16 papers in reputed international journals. She is a editor of International Book ‘Tropical Roots and Tubers: Production, processing and Technology’ published by John Wiley and Sons. She is a author of three chapters published in International Book ‘Tropical Roots and Tubers: Production, processing and Technology’ published by John Wiley and Sons.

Abstract:

The food industry is increasingly moving toward new product development and innovative propositions through new processing methods that allow doing things you could not do before. Thermal treatments have traditionally been used in the food industry to provide the required safety profiles and to extend product shelf-life. However, heat treatments lead to damage of temperature-labile compounds, resulting in partial loss of organoleptic and nutritional properties of food products. In recent years, the potential of novel thermal and non-thermal technologies for food processing has gained industrial interest.  Since these technologies allow the food sector to meet product safety and shelf-life requirements while reducing the impacts on food quality attributes, they have potential to replace, at least partially, the traditional food preservation techniques. Therefore, non-thermal technologies are widely employed for food applications, e.g. high power ultrasounds, pulsed electric fields, light technologies, cold plasma, etc.  The term “non-thermal” is used for technologies that are effective at temperatures below the lethal temperatures of microorganisms, even though some of them may lead to indirect temperature raises in the product. The non-thermal processing is used for all foods for its better quality, acceptance, and for its shelf life also reduces the operational cost. Innovative method have better potential than others conventional method and still an evolving challenging field. The various emerging technologies in food processing and preservation are hurdle technology, high pressure processing, ultrasonication etc. 

Break: Poster Session 15:30-16:00
Networking & Refreshment break, 16:05-16:20
Speaker
Biography:

Shan He has his expertise in the processing waste utilization of food industry, especially seafood industry. He has successfully completed 3 projects regarding processing food processing wastes into value-added, market-ready products, both in Australia and in China. Associate Professor Shan He’s achievement does not only limit in laboratory but also in commercialization. He particularly focuses on the transition of lab outcome into profit for industry. Associate Professor Shan He also started his start-up company (Spencer Pacific Tech Pty Ltd) in Australia with the aim of commercializing advanced technologies.  Due to the excellent achievement of this company, Associate Professor He was invited to join the China Mission Delegation of South Australia Government  (R&D stream) to introduce Australian advanced food technologies in China. Associate Professor Shan He is currently taking this Australian experience into China, and establishing his R&D and commercialization career in both China and Australia.  

Abstract:

Four different processes (enzymatic, microwave-intensified enzymatic, chemical, and microwave-intensified chemical) were used to produce fish protein hydrolysates (FPH) from Yellowtail Kingfish for food applications. In this study, the production yield and oil-binding capacity of FPH produced from different processes were evaluated. Microwave intensification significantly increased the production yields of enzymatic process from 42% to 63%. It also increased the production yields of chemical process from 87% to 98%. The chemical process and microwave-intensified chemical process produced the FPH with low oil-binding capacity (8.66 g oil/g FPH and 6.25 g oil/g FPH), whereas the microwave intensified enzymatic process produced FPH with the highest oil-binding capacity (16.4 g oil/g FPH). The FPH from the 4 processes were applied in the formulation of deep-fried battered fish and deep-fried fish cakes. The fat uptake of deep-fried battered fish can be reduced significantly from about 7% to about 4.5% by replacing 1% (w/w) batter powder with FPH, and the fat uptake of deep-fried fish cakes can be significantly reduced from about 11% to about 1% by replacing 1% (w/w) fish mince with FPH. Food safety tests of the FPH produced by these processes demonstrated that the maximum proportion of FPH that can be safely used in food formulation is 10%, due to its high content of histamine. This study demonstrates the value of FPH to the food industry and bridges the theoretical studies with the commercial applications of FPH

Robert Crabbe

JBS Carriers, USA

Title: Food Logistics & Distribution

Time : 16:40-17:00

Speaker
Biography:

Robert Crabbe is working as a Midwest/Northeast Regional Sales Manager for JBS Carriers, USA.  JBS Carriers is a unique company that not only has assets of our own, but we foster a brokerage as well so that we can partner up with other carriers in order to give a complete solution.  

Abstract:

I believe that there is not a better time to be in the food logistics industry.  Businesses are booming, with new technology and changing of customer trends increasing demand.  Technology has come to the for front and is changing the way the food logistics industry does business and this year is to be filled with even more new innovations to increase efficiency, improve conditions for drivers and help make the farm-to-market chain more transparent and accountable.  At JBS we have already implemented many of these new technologies and all our trucks tracked and monitored with GPS, driver cameras, and ELogs. 

Cold-chain distribution is continuing to see strong growth and it predicted that by 2022 that the food logistics industry to be have a market worth of about 271 billion dollars. This is going to push businesses to strive for better food logistics practices in order to meet customer expectations.  This leads to more competition and better service from transportation providers to customers in order to earn their business. 

However, there are obstacles that every transportation provider has to deal with.  Although the demand for food logistics has risen, part of that rise stems from the decline in number of truck drivers.  The end of 2016 saw the sharpest decline in numbers, with the American Trucking Associations reporting that they accounted for 70% of domestic freight tonnage in 2015.  America’s supply of drivers has been decreasing for the last three years and if we expect to meet the predicted industry growth we will need to make a consorted effort in driver recruitment.  Although the prospect of driverless trucks seems like a solution, that solution is several years down the line before it is implanted in everyday use.  In order to keep in touch with the growing consumer needs, there will need to be an increase in drivers pay and desirability of driving jobs.  One of the things we are doing at JBS to create a regional network.  We are constantly hearing from our drivers their desire to be home more regularly.  So we have come up with a regional model that seems to work very well.  We are aligning ourselves with companies that have needs that match great with our regional network.  We have seen great success because of the regularity of the lane and shippers.  We have come to own these lanes and we are very dependable with a high on-time rate.  This in turn not only makes our customers happy but our drivers as well. 

Another major change that will finally be taking change this year is the ELD rule finally coming into place.  Until recently, the average truck driver filled out an average of 240 RODS per year.  That’s roughly 19 hours spent filling out manual log books.  The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has declared that from December 2017 it will be mandatory for all trucks to be installed with ELD.  The electronic logging will make it easier to track all hours worked.  The FMCSA has also suggested that this will prevent about 1900 crashes by keeping tired drivers off the road.  The devices aren’t just beneficial to the safety of the drivers, but they will save businesses money as well.  These will shake up the core aspect of the food logistics industry but should make things more cost effective and far safer in the long run.

All the factors mentioned above all are important that can lead to success or failure.  However, the biggest single factor is knowledge and communication.  Without knowing what is going on and having great communication between the transportation provider and the business it serves, the logistic plan will fail.  

Break: Session Adjournment