Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 18th Global Summit on Food & Beverages Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Day 3 :

  • Young Researchers Forum
Speaker

Chair

Sai Prakash Chaturvedula

Wisdom Natural Brands, USA

Session Introduction

Waad Alfawaz

King’s College London, UK

Title: The association between depressive symptoms and diet in people at high risk of cardiovascular disease

Time : 10:05-10:25

Speaker
Biography:

Waad Alfawaz is working as a PhD student at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neurosciences, King’s College London, UK.

Abstract:

Background: Depression is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although maintenance of a healthy diet and healthy weight are probably the most crucial ways to prevent CVD but the relationship between depression and diet in people at high risk of CVD has not been fully explored. This study aimed to examine the relationship between depression and diet in a sample of people at high risk of CVD by comparing the differences in nutrient intake between depressed and non-depressed participants.
 
Methods: A cross-sectional study using baseline data of 1704 participants from the MOVE-IT trial, a randomised controlled trial assessing the effectiveness of a healthy lifestyle intervention for people at high risk of cardiovascular disease. The participants were aged between 40-74 years and were recruited from primary care in south London. A 24-hour dietary recall was coded and analysed using DietPlan 7 software. Sucrose, saturated fatty acids and fibres were selected as nutrients of interest. Depression was measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, a 9 item self-report measure of depressive symptoms, and participants were categorised as depressed or non-depressed. Statistical analysis using SPSS software was used to evaluate the relationship between depression and dietary patterns taking into account the potentially confounding variables including age, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status and pre-diabetes status. Pre-diabetes was defined as fasting blood glucose 6.1-6.9 mmol/L. LSD test was used to adjust for multiple comparison groups.
 
Results: There were no significant differences in the intake of saturated fatty acids (p=.998) and sucrose (p=.668) between those categorised as depressed or non-depressed. A significant difference was found in the intake of fibre (p=0.040). People with depressive symptoms consume 2.06gm less fibre than those without depressive symptoms.
 
Conclusions: We found an inverse association between the intake of fibre and depressive symptoms. Underreporting of sucrose and fat may account for their negative effect.
 

Si-Yu Li

China Agricultural University, China

Title: Phenolic and chromatic investigations on red wines made from native Chinese grape species

Time : 10:25-10:45

Speaker
Biography:

Si-Yu Li is a doctor candidate student majoring in Wine Flavor Chemistry, at Center for Viticulture & Enology, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University. As first author, he has published 4 papers in Journal of food science, Molecules, Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, International Journal of Food Properties, respectively, and been listed as co-author in other 2 paper published in Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry and Molecules

Abstract:

The phenolic and chromatic properties of dry red wines made from native Chinese species (Vitis amurensis and its hybrids with V. vinifera grapes) and V. vinifera were evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography/triple-quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry and spectrophotometer, respectively. V. amurensis and its hybrid wines had 3-O-galactosidic and 3, 5-O-diglucosidic anthocyanins exclusively, V. vinifera wines had higher phenolic percentage of flavan-3-ols and 3-O-glucosidic anthocyanins. A deeper hybridization degree between V. amurensis  and V. vinifera can lead to a more complex phenolic profile for new hybrid wines. Due to the compositional differences in phenolic profile, the chromatic values of different wines changed. Wines of V. amurensis and its hybrids had relatively higher a*, b* and chroma values, and lower L* value. By the use of principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis, specific phenolic compounds could be recognized as phenolic fingerprints of different wines, which not only play an important role in wine differentiation, but also explain their chromatic differences. As a special V. amurensis × V. vinifera hybrid cultivar which is now wildly used for icewine making, the phenolic evolution of Beibinghong red icewine during fermentation was also introduced, together with the phenolic and chromatic comparison between the final Beibinghong icewine and dry wine product.

Break: Networking & Refreshment Break, 10:45-11:05

Bal Kumari Sharma Khanal

The University of Queensland, Australia

Title: Effect of sodium alginate addition on properties of low fat Cheddar cheese

Time : 11:05-11:25

Speaker
Biography:

Bal Kumari Sharma Khanal is a PhD student at the University of Queensland, Australia undertaking a research on low fat Cheddar cheese. Now, she is in her final year of PhD.  The main disadvantage of low fat cheese is that when the fat is removed, its textural, functional and sensory properties are adversely affected. In order to minimize these negative effects, she has prepared low fat Cheddar cheese by different approaches including use of sodium alginate as a fat replacer. She has found that the textural and biochemical properties of alginate added low fat Cheddar cheese are closer to its full fat counterpart, suggesting that the sodium alginate could be a potential fat replacer to prepare low fat Cheddar cheese. 
 

Abstract:

Four different concentrations of sodium alginate (alginate) were used to prepare low fat cheese (LFC) with a fat and energy value reduction up to 91% and 55%, respectively. The varying levels of alginate added in LFCs were 0.12 (LFCA1), 0.17 (LFCA2), 0.18 (LFCA3) and 0.23% (w/w) (LFCA4). Control full fat cheese (CFFC) and control low fat cheese (CLFC) were used for the comparison. Physical characteristics, namely texture profile analysis (TPA), microstructure and color were analysed throughout ripening period until 180 days. All cheese samples were examined for physical, chemical and biochemical properties such as composition, yield, texture and proteolysis. The yield of the cheeses (P<0.05) was directly proportional to the fat and alginate level in milk, whereas the moisture and total protein were inversely proportional to the fat content (P<0.05). The results of primary proteolysis (except pH 4.6 soluble nitrogen) showed that alginate added LFCs demonstrated higher level of proteolysis compared to CLFC and CFFC, whereas arginine was found in highest level in alginate added LFCs. Concentrations of volatile compounds also varied with cheese treatment. TPA illustrated a significant improvement in texture of alginate added LFC (P<0.05) compared to CLFC. The textural attributes of LFCA1 ripened for 30 days were comparable to CFFC ripened for 60 days and beyond. Scanning electron micrograph images revealed that alginate added LFCs had smoother surfaces as compared to CFFC and CLFC. Confocal laser scanning microscopy suggested significant (P<0.05) increase in fat globules’ size, area and volume in CFFC as compared to LFCs during ripening.  Hunter L, a and b values for alginate added LFCs indicated that they were whiter than CLFC and less yellowish than CFFC. Addition of alginate significantly improved the textural and microstructural properties of LFCs, affirming its potential as a promising fat replacer. 

Speaker
Biography:

Peitong Liu is a PhD candidate at Key Laboratory of Viticulture and Enology, China Agricultural University. Her research interests focus on wine fermentative flavour compounds.

Abstract:

Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs, including L-leucine, L-isoleucine and L-valine) are important volatile compounds precursors in grape must, which can directly influence the aroma profile of final wine. Linoleic acid, as the most abundant fatty acid in must, has great effect on yeast fermentation performance and formation of volatile compounds in wine. To investigate the synergistic influences of BCAAs and linoleic acid on volatile compounds of wine, BCAAs (120 mg/l L-leucine, 100 mg/l L-isoleucine and 90 mg/l L-valine) were added into Cabernet Sauvignon grape juice containing three concentration of linoleic acid (12 mg/L, 120 mg/L and 240 mg/L) fermented by Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118, respectively. The supplementation of BCAAs in must with low linoleic acid (12 mg/l) promoted the production of most volatile compounds, including higher alcohols (isobutanol, 2,3-butanediol and 2-phenylethanol), acetate esters (isoamyl acetate and 2-phenylethyl acetate) and ethyl esters (ethyl butanoate and ethyl octanoate). As assessed by odour activity values, the increment of these volatile compounds intensified the fruity, flowery, herbaceous and caramel attributes of the final wine. On the other hand, adding BCAAs in must with medium (120 mg/l) or high (240 mg/l) linoleic acid increased the concentrations of medium-chain fatty acids (hexanoic acid, octanoic acid and decanoic acid), and enhanced the fatty profiles of wine compared to the wine of low linoleic acid addition. These results suggested that the beneficial effect of adding BCAAs on volatile compounds in wine is largely dependent on the level of linoleic acid in grape must, and the combined addition of BCAAs and linoleic acid could be a potential way to manipulate wine’s aromatic profile by influencing the formation of certain aroma compounds.

Speaker
Biography:

Adijat Funke Ogundola focuses her research findings on evaluation of health benefits and improving the production of economic important wild vegetables. Currently, she based her studies on Solanum nigrum L. She has publications on micro-morphological studies, phytochemical constituents and antioxidant properties, also on essential oil chemical compounds and antioxidant properties aspects. Her study was based on how best the wild vegetables could be explored to alleviate food insecurity and likely problems. The primary step was to bring them to cultivation and their integration in food data base. Continuous production in the face of climate change, fire hazard, and natural disaster such as flood to explore the health benefits from wild vegetables was considered necessary by her. Therefore, she evaluates the health benefits and performances of these vegetables with the aim of improving on their production using green revolution system and in controlled environment. 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Food insecurity and malnutrition which could be as a result of climate change is an existing menace in developing countries. One of the approaches of combating this menace has been through domesticating wild vegetables. Solanum nigrum, a wild vegetable in most African countries has been identified as a potential source in combating this scourge. It is a gregarious plant which could withstand varying environmental conditions. Its fast growing nature ensures its maturity under a short period of time irrespective of the environmental conditions. Being considered a weed, little attention was given for its domestication and its survival is becoming more precarious. Hence, its potential in combating food insecurity are been eroded. This study focuses on quantitative exploration of the performance and health benefits of S. nigrum cultivated on different soil texture types with a view to domesticate and make it readily available all year round. Methodology: Seeds of S. nigrum were raised in nursery trays and transplanted into pots filled with different soil types at 4-leaf stage in the greenhouse. Harvesting was done at 4 weeks after transplanting. Nutritional and pharmacological studies were carried out on micromorphology, proximate/nutritional composition, phytochemical constituents/antioxidants properties and essential oil extraction using documented procedures Findings: The outcome of this study revealed that domestication of S. nigrum under controlled environment encourages several (8 times) production cycles within a year as against the wild species that wither under extreme heat and cold. The different soil types influenced the growth and pharmacological performance to some extent, but generally S. nigrum in this study showed remarkable nutraceutical potential with high nutrients and food materials. It acts as a significant natural radical scavenger. The integration in dietary supplement will not only alleviate the effect of climate change on food security but also serves as immune booster.

Deepak Francis

Ariston School of business studies, India

Title: Food processing technology and growth of food processing industries in India

Time : 12:05-12:25

Speaker
Biography:

Deepak Francis has completed his Bsc hotel management and catering science at the age of 21 years from kerala University and post graduate studies doing from Ariston business school. He is working with manipal global and city guilds, an education organization. He had worked in cruise lines as a chef.

Abstract:

In the past ten years, India has left no stone unturned to ensure the growth of the Food Processing Industry in India. It has been primarily due to the significance the industry holds as it employs around 19% of the total population with its vital linkages in the key sectors which are agriculture and manufacturing and contributes to around 9% of the GDP. 
 
And while the new global economy ushers in a rapid expansion of the worldwide distribution of agricultural products, my concern now is not only to produce food in sufficient quantity, but also to enhance the competitiveness of the Indian agricultural industry in the world market by developing value-added foods based on higher quality standards and improved processing techniques. The development and promotion of high-quality and value-added agro-products are vital in response to the changing market and consumer preferences amid recent trends in economic development and globalization, as well as the expanding population.
 
Food processing industry in India is increasingly seen as a potential source for driving the rural economy as it brings about synergy between the consumer, industry and agriculture. A well-developed food processing industry is expected to increase farm gate prices, reduce wastages, ensure value addition, promote crop diversification, generate employment opportunities as well as export earnings .Agro-processing is now regarded as the sunrise sector of the Indian economy in view of its large potential for growth and likely socio economic impact specifically on employment and income generation.
 

Speaker
Biography:

Endang Rahmawati has passion and spirit in the field of food and nutrition innovation to improve the quality of public health in Indonesia. Through the research, it is hoped to utilize the potential of Indonesian local crops as the material for fermentation products with the high quality. Currently, Endang is studying in master program, University of Indonesia with specialization in microbiology. He is also active and focused on researching potential bacteria from various ecosystems in Indonesia.

Abstract:

Yoghurt is a popular fermented drink in the world and is beneficial to the health of the body. During this time, yoghurt sold on the market made from cow's milk and has not been innovated. Yoghurt can be innovated by adding ingredients that can improve the quality and nutritional value of yoghurt, one of which is Moringa leaves extract. Moringa leaves extract is derived from Indonesian local plant that has high nutrient and bioactive compound that is important for the body, because it contains protein, carbohydrate, calcium, vitamin, tannin, flavonoids, steroids and saponins. The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of addition Moringa leaves extract with different fermentation period to protein content, pH, and total lactic acid bacteria in cow’s milk yoghurt. The research method use a complete randomized design of two factors: factor 1, concentration of Moringa leaves extract (K): 0%, 5%, 10% and factor 2, fermentation period (hours) (F): 8, 10, 12. The result show that the highest level of protein in the treatment K1F2 (extract of Moringa leaves 5%: fermentation period 10 hours) is 0.870%, while the lowest protein content in treatment K0F1 (extract of Moringa leaves 0%: fermentation period 8 hours) is 0.179%. Interaction between various addition extract of Moringa leaves and fermentation period  significantly affect the pH of cow’s yoghurt. The highest total of lactic acid bacteria in the treatment K1F1 and K1F2 with the same number that is 2,50 x107 CFU/ml and the lowest in treatment K0F1 1,0x107 CFU/ml.  

Break: Lunch Break 12:45-13:30
Conference Adjournment