Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 5th Euro-Global Summit and Expo on Food & Beverages Alicante, Spain.

Day 2 :

OMICS International Euro Food-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ian Maddox photo
Biography:

Ian Maddox is an Emeritus Professor at Massey University, New Zealand. He has worked in industrial microbiology for 40 years and is currently a member of the Science Advisory Boards of two US companies, and an editorial board member of two international, refereed journals.

Abstract:

Lactobacillus reuteri DPC 16 is a probiotic bacterium that is commercially available. It was originally isolated from a human source and its in vitro properties have been intensively studied. This presentation will detail the functional properties of the bacterium in terms of its activity against various pathogens and its properties in some selected anti-cancer assay systems. In addition, a technique for successful delivery of the bacterium to the site of action in the gastrointestinal tract will be described.

Keynote Forum

Patrick Berry

Allfoodexperts®
Spain

Keynote: How can you go wrong with 17,000 years of accumulated technical knowledge? Patrick Berry

Time : 10:50 - 11:15

OMICS International Euro Food-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Patrick Berry photo
Biography:

Patrick Berry is since 2012 the Vice President of Marketing and Communication at Blendhub Corp a group of companies that includes Premium Ingredients, Portable Powder Blending and Allfoodexperts®. He is involved in several innovative projects such as SMART Powder Blends which aims to optimize the supply chain of food ingredients powder, the first portable mill for mixing powdered ingredients (PPB) and Allfoodexperts®. With Allfoodexperts® he fights for open innovation in the food industry and is always looking for ways to break the status quo. He has also been a Guest Professor at Bureau Veritas, the Instituto de Empresa and other business schools.

Abstract:

Allfoodexperts® is an open innovation platform specialized in solving challenges for the agri-food industry. We are now a community of close to 900 members worldwide with an average of 20 years experience as food technologists. The community covers all areas of the food industry such as dairy, beverage and every expertise needed from developing a product, finding technologies or ingredients down to setting up machinery, packing and logistics. Our members are retired technicians and consultants who want to work on projects for an adequate reward but also employed technicians interested in sharing their knowledge. We want to provide our members with as many challenges as possible and help the food industry innovating and finding applied solutions. Our client base reaches from multinational companies who want to outsource their innovation down to small and medium size companies without R&D departments. Through only accepting SMART challenges we make sure we don’t waist the time of our community. After more than three years running an open innovation project, we know that open innovation works. Open Innovation is not just a buzz word it is reality-our Open Innovation platform and community with 17,000 years of accumulated technical knowledge is the best prove.

  • Track 8: Food and Beverages Industry
    Track 14: Regulatory Affairs
    Track 15: Breaking Innovations in Food and Beverages
Speaker

Chair

Jose S. Torrecilla

Complutense University of Madrid 

Speaker

Co-Chair

Angel Gil-Izquierdo

CEBAS-CSIC

Session Introduction

Suzana Caetano da Silva Lannes

University of Sao Paulo
Brazil

Title: New colloids as fat substitutes
Speaker
Biography:

Suzana Caetano da Silva Lannes is an Associate Professor at Pharmaceutical Sciences School of University of São Paulo. She is President of Brazilian Society of Food Science and Technology, and Vice President of Brazilian Association of Rheology. She has published papers in reputed journals, book chapters, and has been serving as Editor in Chief of Food Science and Technology-CTA Journal. She has developed research works in the Food Science and Technology area, on the following subjects: Rheology, physics of foods, development of special and nutritional food formulations and study of fat foods (emulsion, chocolate products, cupuassu, mayonnaise, ice cream and bakery).

Abstract:

Natural polysaccharides have been widely investigated in recent years in relation to their physicochemical characteristics and applications. Some of its properties are biodegradability, abundance in nature and versatility of applications in engineering, biotechnology, medicine and food because they are generally nontoxic. Sterculia genus trees are known for its acidic polysaccharides with high solution viscosity and gelation characteristics. The Sterculia striata is a species native to most Brazilian regions and has been compared with other polysaccharides such as guar gum which has a multitude of applications in the food industry. The cashew gum is a hetero polysaccharide of exudate species Anacardium occidentale L., and has characteristics similar to those of Arabic gum, representing a potential substituent to various gums used in food industry. The majority of the gelatins produced by the industries are extracted from cattle hides, beef bones, and pork skin. However, by sociocultural issues and frequent occurrence of diseases such as Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, there is a growing interest in developing alternative sources of raw materials with good physical properties. Considering that Brazil is one of the largest of poultry meat in the world as a result generating large amount of byproducts rich in collagen and also that the texture is one of the most important commercial criteria used to evaluate the quality of a gelatin. The rheological characterization of the developed products demonstrates the features of their behavior determining the relationship between the structure and interactions of the various ingredients in foods and the final rheological properties of the gel.

Speaker
Biography:

Angel Gil-Izquierdo has completed his PhD from University of Murcia (Spain) and the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and Postdoctoral studies from Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA-Clermont-Ferrad-Theix, France) under the supervision of Dr. Claudine Manach, Dr. Christine Morand, Dr. Marie-Noëlle Horcajada and Dr. Augustin Scalbert. Now he is the tenured research scientist at CEBAS-CSIC (Spanish National Research Council) working in human and clinical nutrition, food science and technology, oxidative stress, metabolomics and new markers for detection of human pathologies. He has lead projects from national and international organisms, and he has been member of the Experts Committee at the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). To date, he has published 96 papers in reputed journals of the Science Citation Index (SCI).

Abstract:

In humans and mammals, oxidative stress has been associated to the pathogenesis of several chronic diseases. High levels of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species (RNOS) overwhelm the antioxidant defenses in the organism and conduct to the oxidative damage of lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. Besides, lipid peroxidation products have been investigated in order to determine their use as biomarkers of oxidative status in the human body. Arachidonic acid (ALA), adrenic acid (AdA) and docosahexanoic acid (DHA) are commonly studied fatty acids which result in isoprostanes (IsoPs) F2-dihomo-isoprostanes (F2-dihomo-IsoPs), and neuroprostanes (NeuroPs), respectively. In our laboratory, nutritional and clinical trials including physical exercise, and the intake of plant foods (i.e. citrus-based functional foods, broccoli sprouts, and wine (D.O. Rioja, Spain)) has delivered positive effects against the generation of these biomarkers of oxidative stress (oxidative stress-based-lipidomics). On the other hand, these types of RNOS are also generated in secondary plants. Particularly, one of the free radical attacks take place against fatty acids. When the oxidative reaction of RNOS is against alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) -the predominant polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in plants-, new compounds named phytoprostanes emerge in plant tissues. These compounds could be used as control quality of the plant foods processing techniques and from a nutritional point of view; the phytoprostanes are absorbed by the human body and show a mimic structure like prostanoids and isoprostanes. Therefore, the intake of plant foods rich in phytoprostanes may have effects on neurodegenerative, vascular and inflammation disorders linked to F2-dihomo-IsoPs and NeuroPs, and IsoPs markers, respectively.

Speaker
Biography:

Jeanne Dalencompleted her Ph.D. in 2008 in Clinical Psychology at the University of New Mexico (UNM). She is currently a Research Assistant Professor in the UNM Department of Pediatrics and a Research Scientist at the Oregon Research Institute; Center for Family and Adolescent Research (ORI-CFAR). Her expertise in Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine is informed by over 15 years’ experience conducting both research and clinical work in obesity and diabetes populations. She is currently Principal Investigator for an National Institutes of Health funded clinical research study to adapt and pilot a family-based mindful eating intervention for overweight adolescents.

Abstract:

Overweight and obesity is one of the major global health challenges of the 21st century. Few enduring treatment strategies have been identified and acritical need exists to expand treatment development efforts beyond traditional education and diet-based programs and to explore alternative models. Meditation-based mindful eating programs are growing in popularity as interventions for disordered eating and weight loss and could advance treatment and prevention efforts by providing a unique relevancy in addressing key psychological risk factors that prior to have been missing from traditional weight loss programs. Specifically, the discussion will focus on how mindful eating corresponds directly to two intervention targets implicated in both the development and maintenance of overweight and obesity. These include 1) reduced psychosocial functioning including depression and body dissatisfaction; and 2) disordered eating behaviors including unhealthy weight control practices (UWCP), frequent dieting, and emotional binge eating.In this presentation, an introduction to the principles of mindful eating will be given, along with a discussion on how mindful eating differs from traditional diet-based approaches to eating behavior change. In addition, recent research findings in this area will be highlighted, and a framework for using mindful eating interventions with families will be presented.

Speaker
Biography:

José S Torrecilla is a Professor of the Chemical Engineering Department of the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM). He received his PhD in Chemical Engineering from UCM in 2000. From all of his main lines of research, it is worth highlighting the modeling of complex systems and the design of chemo metric tools used in many fields such as health, chemistry, engineering, and food technology. He has collaborated with numerous universities as well as national and international research facilities. The impact of his research can be measured with the great number of published articles in various prestigious international journals, some books related with his research lines, and a few national and European patents. His importance can also be evaluated through the participation and coordination of a great number of competitive projects inside the American, European, and national frameworks. During the last few years he has given lectures and seminars at distinguished international research centers, being the main coordinator of some them.

Abstract:

Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) is the only fat which comes from the juice of fruits, more specifically, from the olive. For this reason, olive oil is one of the healthiest kinds of oils. As a general concept, the degradation of olive oil negatively affects the beneficial characteristics it provides. EVOO normally degrades because of the oxidation of the chlorophyll it contains. Chlorophyll suffers from degradation due to different causes such as light, time, and/or temperature. These phenomena oxidize chlorophyll, which loses its containing magnesium atom, originating the loss of green intensity of the olive oil. This physicochemical process can be characterized through UV-Visible spectroscopy, as changes appear reflected in the absorption spectra as the oil is degraded. In this study, a series of EVOO samples, from both pure varietals and binary mixtures, have been monitored through absorption studies during 45 days to evaluate the effect of time and light on the samples. The data obtained was used to estimate the degradation time that the EVOO samples have undergone using a mathematical model based on artificial neural networks, which provided a mean absolute error of less than 5.5%. These algorithms have enabled the design of a tool that can be employed to evaluate the quality of an EVOO, and to determine how it has been treated since its departure from the olive mill.

Speaker
Biography:

Gema Nieto has completed his PhD in 2009 at the University of Murcia and Postdoctoral studies in several centers as University of Life Science (Denmark), University of Kentucky (USA) and University of Tras’os Montes (Portugal). She is a young Researcher who has published numerous high quality papers in different scientific journals of Food Technology and Human Nutrition and has been invited as speaker in several national and international conferences. At the moment, she is an Associate Professor in the University of Murcia and member of the research group in Human Nutrition.

Abstract:

The production of peptides through hydrolytic reactions seems to be the most promising technique to form proteinaceous antioxidants since peptides have substantially higher antioxidant activity than intact proteins. While hydrolyzed proteins have good antioxidant activity, it is still not well-understood how the composition of peptides influences their ability to inhibit lipid oxidation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the radical scavenging peptides from in vitro digests of chicken protein. For that, Chicken protein (CP) isolate was subjected to a two-stage in vitro digestion (1 h pepsin followed by 2-h pancreatin at 37ºC). The antioxidant potential of the CP digests was compared by assessing their capacity to scavenge 2, 20-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiszoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS+) and DPPH, (hydroxyl •OH) radicals. The pepsin digest, which demonstrated the strongest activity against both radicals, was subjected to Sephadex G-25 gel filtration. Of the three fractions collected, fractions II (734 Da) and III (730 Da) showed the highest ABTS+ scavenging activity and were 30-32% superior to mixed chicken protein digest (P<0.05). Fraction III was most effective in neutralizing OH and was 89% more efficient (P<0.05) than mixed chicken digest. LC–MS/MS identified Ile-Glu-Cys, His,Val (III); Tyr, Val, Lys, Gln (II) and Arg, Glu,Ser,Ile,Gly, Asp (I) to be the prominent peptides/ amino acid in these fractions. Understanding the relationship between peptide composition and antioxidant activity could lead to the development of new class of extremely effective, multifunctional, generally recognized as safe antioxidants that could be used in many food applications.

Speaker
Biography:

Eugene T Dillon has completed his BSc, MSc and PhD studies in the field of Nutrition, specializing in molecular nutrition and the development of insulin resistance during obesity. As part of the FHI technology transfer team, he applies the field of proteomics to understand global peptide profiles of high protein functional foods with health benefits.

Abstract:

High protein foods and functional foods with bioactive proteins and peptides are major growth areas to for the food ingredients industry. The basis of claims for functional food ingredients requires the findings from basic nutritional research and subsequent double blind placebo controlled feeding studies for their substantiation. However, batch to batch variations in protein content and ingredient preparation can lead to changes in the health benefits of protein foods. In order to fully characterize functional food ingredients and to provide a platform for the sustainable development of functional food ingredients to maintain consumer confidence in this emerging growth area, Food for Health Ireland (FHI) employs proteomic analysis and mass spectrometry in the identification of novel bioactive peptides for functional food ingredients. FHI builds upon recent advances in mass spectrometry for reliable and accurate identification and quantification of proteins and peptides, such as those bioactive components of functional food ingredients. This analysis adds credibility to the functional food ingredients through the identification and monitoring of presence of bioactive functional ingredients despite variations in plant production and protein ingredient preparations. This presentation will give an insight into the role of characterization as a mechanism in decoding the ambiguity around protein sources in functional foods which are responsible for health claims, providing proof and clarity of their presence as well as understanding their benefits to health and ultimately ensuring more trust for consumers in the functional food industry

Yoav D Livney

Technion Israel Institute of Technology
Israel

Title: Clearly healthy: novel natural invisible carriers for nutraceuticals
Speaker
Biography:

Yoav D. Livney,Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Technion, Israel[B.Sc. (Suma cum Laude, 1990) in Food Engineering & Biotechnology, Technion; M.S. (1995) Food Engineering,UW Madison, Wisconsin, USA;PhD (2002) Food Engineering& Biotechnology Technion Israel;Post-Doc Food Science, UoG, Guelph, Ontario, Canada]; At Technion since 2004- Lecturer; 2007- Asst. Professor, 2012- Assoc. Prof.An expert in physical chemistry of biopolymers, andbioactivesdelivery. Received many Honors & Awards including the President of Israel’s honor roll, and the Goldberg Research Prize. Yoav D. Livney authored ~40 publications, 8 patents, gave over 30 invited talks and many contributed presentations at international conferences, and mentored 12 M.Sc. and 7 Ph.D. students.

Abstract:

The enrichment of clear beverages with hydrophobic nutraceuticals is a tough challenge, but an important one to overcome. This is because water and popular soft drinks are consumed by practically everyone, and hence may serve as excellent platforms for improving public health by providing essential micronutrient and health-promoting agents as a mean of preventive medicine. The challenge comprises multiple elements: poor aqueous solubility of the hydrophobic nutraceuticals, high sensitivity to deterioration by oxidation and other chemical and physical factors, adverse sensory properties of certain nutraceuticals, high costs of the bioactive and of the solubilization/encapsulation materials used, processing, storage and shipment conditions, limitations, regulatory hurdles, including strict limitations on health claims, and on novel ingredients and technologies, religious constraints (Kosher, Halal), allergenicity of certain encapsulating materials, consumer demand for label friendly ingredients (“all natural ingredients”),poor bioavailability of certain hydrophobic nutraceuticals, and more.Over the last decade, we have developed a series of novel technologies for nanoencapsulation of hydrophobic nutraceuticals using natural biopolymersin nature-inspired approaches, with great emphasis on enrichment of clear beverage systems. The talk will provide an overview the main technologies we have introduced and studied, including: beta Beta lactoglobulin (beta-lg)-polysaccharide electrostatic nanocomplexes, Thermally treated beta-lg-EGCG nanoparticles, beta casein (beta-CN) micelles, beta-conglycinin (beta-Cg) nanoparticles, self-assembling Maillard reaction conjugates, hydrophobin co-assemblies, and lately, new plant-protein-based nanoparticles.

Magda Johanna Vandeloo

European Cancer Prevention Organisation
Belgium

Title: Highlighting the importance of nutrition in breast cancer risk
Speaker
Biography:

Magda Johanna Vandeloo is Dietician by education. Since 1985 she is working as head at the Department of Nutrition, Jessa Hospital Hasselt Belgium. After obtaining her Bachelor’s degree in Management, she completed her Master’s degree Natural Sciences, ‘Environmental Sciences’, with emphasis in Nutrition and Toxicology in 2006, both from the Open University of the Netherlands. Currently she is working on a new study about Lifestyle, Mammographic Breast Density and Molecular Profiles of Breast Cancer. The intention is to obtain the degree of PhD in Biomedical Sciences at the Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences from the Hasselt University, Belgium.

Abstract:

Breast cancer is among the most lethal forms of cancer in the world affecting one out of 8 women in Western Countries. The main risk factors are early menarche, increased length and weight, late first full-term pregnancy, nulliparity, late age at menopause and hormonal substitution. Recently, also high mammographic density is considered to be a strong risk factor as well. Less than 10 per cent have a hereditary background. Of particular importance is early menarche that confers lifetime influence on risk. The breast is most vulnerable at the very onset for development. We studied 1146 healthy girls between birth and the age of 13 for the presence of dietary and lifestyle factors that correlate with early puberty and menarche. Univariate and multivariate analyses show clear evidence that the lifestyle, including nutrition do have an effect on both breast development and menarche. With regard to high mammographic density as determinant for breast cancer, researchers suggest that women who have breast density of 75% or greater have almost fivefold increased risk of breast cancer compared with women with absence of density. Only a few studies have evaluated the effect of diet and lifestyle on mammographic density, and results are inconsistent. As breast cancer risk is difficult to influence in adult age, preventive strategies should be applied as early as feasible. Better control of nutritional factors and lifestyle during childhood might reduce breast cancer risk later in life.

  • Track 7: Contaminants in Food and Beverages
    Track 10: European Food Technology
    Track 12: Processing and Packaging Technology
    Track 13: Future of Innovation in the next 5 to 10 years
Speaker

Chair

Alexander V Sirotkin

Constantine the Philosopher University
Slovakia

Speaker

Co-Chair

Yoav D Livney

Technion Israel Institute of Technology 
Israel

Session Introduction

Anna Hejlová

Czech University of Life Sciences Prague
Czech Republic

Title: Potato sloughing and instrumental methods for its assessment
Speaker
Biography:

Anna Hejlová majored in Numerical Methods and Algorithms at the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics at Charles University, Prague, in 1986. She worked at the Institute of Computer Science at the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. Now she works as a Senior Lecturer at Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Department of Mathematics. She completed her PhD in the field of Agricultural Engineering and Technology in 2007. Recently her professional activity has been connected with the study of mechanical properties of materials of biological origin, the results of which have been published in more than 10 papers.

Abstract:

Potato texture involves many attributes which characterize the potato tuber quality and its suitability for various kinds of processing. The phenomenon of “sloughing”, the flaking and disintegration of the outer layers of boiled potato tubers is considered as one of the principal characteristics of potato texture. Potatoes are classified into different cooking types which are included into the potato texture profile. This simple classification is based on the disintegration ability of cooked tubers with a scale given by two opposite descriptors: Salad and sloughed. The CPEM (Cooked Potato Effective Mass) method for potato sloughing assessment was developed as a modification of common CPW (Cooked Potato Weight) tests. The method is based on the continuous determination of the decrease in effective mass of the potato sample during boiling. 100 g of potato flakes, the size of 10×10×1.5 mm are cut off from the inner parenchyma and subsequently boiled and stirred in a sieve under a special time regime, which enables balance data registration. The obtained effective mass data are plotted against time into the cooking curve. The method provides qualitatively new cooking parameters: Cooking Time (CT) as the starting point of disintegration and consequently the disintegration rate, both of which characterize the sloughing degree. The developed method provides a tool to characterize the degree of sloughing for a wide scale of cultivars – from much sloughed ones (CT<6 min) to non-sloughed ones (CT>14 min). Moreover, it enables a precise sloughing analysis in dependence on tuber density.

Speaker
Biography:

Erkan Karacabey completed Doctorate in Food Engineering Department of Middle East Technical University in 2009. He has been in Canada for one year as a Visitor Scientist in PARC (Pacific Agricultural Research Center of AAFC. He has publications and projects about Unit Operations in Food Engineering. He has been working as an Assistant Professor in Food Engineering Department of Suleyman Demirel University since 2012.

Abstract:

Oil uptake by food material is the main concern in process and it is crucial to control its amount during process due in part to its adverse health effect on human diet in case of excessive consumption. As a demand in this aspect manufacturers have been tried to decrease oil content of fried food materials using different pretreatments. One of them is partial dehydration of food material before frying. The purpose in this study was to reduce oil uptake of fried carrot slices using partial drying before deep-fat-frying. Two different drying methods were utilized and by this way their effects were examined. Drying trials were performed in a conventional oven and microwave one. For drying by conventional technique, oven temperature and weight loss of food material were independent variables, whereas in microwave oven specified weight loss was the controlled parameter. Frying temperature and time were the variables for pretreatments performed by both techniques. Optimization was aimed to minimize oil uptake of carrot slices after combined pre-drying and frying processes compared to directly deep-fat-fried ones. Model performance indicated high prediction ability of developed equations. Besides of oil uptake, moisture content and surface color were other interested responses in the present study, since moisture content was directly related to oil uptake during frying process and surface color was one of the significant quality indicators. Related equations were also found to be successful to estimate values of interested parameters as a function of studied process variables.

Carmen Bueno-Ferrer

Dublin Institute of Technology
Ireland  

Title: Cold Plasma Processing
Speaker
Biography:

Carmen Bueno-Ferrer graduated in Food Science and Technology at the University of Granada (Spain). On June 2012 she was awarded her PhD in Chemistry at University of Alicante (Polymers and Nanomaterials Analysis group), for research on development of biocomposites based on vegetable oils for food packaging applications. She is currently undertaking a Postdoctoral research in the School of Food Sciences at Dublin Institute of Technology (Ireland), where she is carrying out the evaluation of changes in meat quality and different food packaging materials as affected by cold plasma discharge used for in-pack sterilization. She has published 10 peer-reviewed articles and 5 book chapters as well as participated in several international conferences.

Abstract:

Plasma (an energetic ionized gas) is widely used for industrial materials processing to enhance surface properties such as adhesion or printability. However, it has recently shown promise as a non-thermal decontamination tool for food stuffs. This is largely due to new technologies which easily produce non-thermal plasmas (NTPs) at atmospheric pressure. NTP has been shown to injure and inactivate pathogenic bacteria on inert food contact surfaces, on a variety of foods and in liquids. The antimicrobial efficacy of NTP is related to the specific technology used, the power level and the gas mixture used in plasma generation and the intensity and duration of exposure. To date, NTP has been used effectively for surface decontamination on fresh produce, and it is currently being studied under the MEATPACK project (European Commision, FP7) as en efficient tool for in-package decontamination of meat products, which would represent a global breakthrough for the meat industry in terms of shelf-life extension. Different types of meat, comprising both cooked and raw meat, combined with different gas blends for Modified Atmosphere (MA) Packaging has been included in the study. Therefore, the combined effect of MA-packaging and NTP treatment is being investigated in deep not only from the microbiological decontamination perspective but also from the effects on meat quality and changes in food packaging materials after the plasma treatment.

Speaker
Biography:

Cem Baltacioğlu graduated with Bachelor of Science from Department of Food Engineering at Ankara University at 2001. He graduated with Doctor of Philosophy from Department of Food Engineering at Middle East Technical University at 2012. He is working as Assistant Professor at Niğde University.

Abstract:

Texture of food product is a significant physical phenomenon for consumer’s preference. Thus textural changes of food materials should be considered during any food process. In this study it was aimed to investigate change of textural properties of carrot slices under influences of pre-drying and frying processes. Although main purpose of pretreatment was to decrease oil uptake by food material, our results indicated this desired target was achieved, textural change as a function of both combined processes’ parameters was also examined to figure out preferableness of those carrot slices. Conventional drying was performed in an oven in which temperature and weight losses were controlled parameters. Another studied method for pre-drying was microwave technique in which weight loss was controlled variable. Oil temperature and process time were parameters of deep-fat-frying. Sunflower was used as frying oil. Response surface methodology was used for optimization of processes’ parameters to achieve target values of textural properties for which sensory analysis was performed to determine at directly deep-fat-fried carrot slices. Carrot slice received the highest appreciation for studied textural properties were also measured instrumentally, and results were used target values in optimization processes. The developed models for pre-drying by conventional oven and deep-fat-frying and pre-drying by microwave oven and deep-fat-frying were found to display high success for prediction of interested textural responses. Models for latter one had better prediction ability compared to former one. Change in textural properties with process parameters were also figured out.

Speaker
Biography:

RubénLópez-Nicolás has completed his PhD at the University of Murcia and Postdoctoral studies in several reputed centres as ProDigest, Rowett Institute for Nutrition and Health, and University of Leeds. He is a young Researcher who has published numerous high quality papers in different scientific journals of Molecular Biology and Human Nutrition and has been invited as speaker in several national and international conferences. Now-a-days, he is a Member of ERC Expert Committee to evaluate “Starting Grants”, as well as Member of Young Researcher Committee in SATIN.

Abstract:

Now-a-days, overweight and obesity are a major challenge to the health of developed developingcountries. A strategy followed is based on reduction of food intake based on the physiological concepts of satiety and satiation. To try to elucidate the mechanism of pro-satiety food components, as part of the European funded FP7 SATIN (SATietyINnovation) Project, we have studied by mean of an artificial gastrointestinal dynamic model (SHIME®, Simulator of the Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem, resembling physiological and microbiological conditions occurring in the stomach, small intestine and the colon) the stability of key dietary ingredients such as resistant starch (Actistar® 11700, Cargill), β-glucans (Viscofiber®, Naturex) and arabinoxylans (NAXUS®, BioActor), and their effect on the release of satiety hormones by entero-endocrine cell lines and on chemosensor receptors’ activation, as well as the activity of colon microbiota. Samples were monitored by HPLC-MS for the stability of the key bioactive component of the ingredients. Bioavailability (using the Caco-2 cell line) and the impact of ingredients on the gut microbial communities were also evaluated. The stability of the three ingredients was very similar, showing a high resistance to upper gastrointestinal conditions, while in the colon, they were fermented in different grade. Arabinoxylans was highly fermentable, while resistant starch and β-glucans showed lower degradation by colon bacteria (20-35%, 70-75% and 70% of the ingredients were found at the end of the colon, respectively). Furthermore, changes in microbial fermentation activity could be observed. While resistant starch increased acetate and lactate production, arabinoxylans and β-glucans induced a shift towards more butyrate and propionate. Obtained results from the in vitro screening platform on non-digested ingredients, showed arabinoxylans increase GLP-1 and CCK secretion.

  • Young Research Forum

Session Introduction

Vladimiro Cardenia

University of Bologna
Italy

Title: Cholesterol photosensitized oxidation products in food systems
Speaker
Biography:

Vladimiro Cardenia in 2009 received the “Marco Polo” grant in order to carry out a research activity at University of Massachusetts - Amherst (USA). In 2010, he received the Ph.D. degree in Food Science and Biotechnology. In 2012 he got a biennial Post-doc grant focused on the effect of the diet on human and animal metabolism. In 2013 he gained the “best poster competition” award by Society of Chemical Industry of London. He is author/co-author of more than 16 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as managing Editor’s assistant for Journal of Food Composition and Analysis (Elsevier).

Abstract:

Lipid oxidation is one of the main chemical degradations occurring in biological and food systems and leads to the formation of compounds that are related to aging and various chronic and degenerative diseases. The extent of oxidation will depend on the presence of antioxidants/pro-oxidants, the unsaturation degree of fatty acids, and environmental conditions. Lipid oxidation can also affect other molecules such as cholesterol leading to formation of its oxidation products (COPs), which exert a strong impact on the lipid metabolism and are involved in various chronic and degenerative diseases and disturbance of cell functionality. Additionally, the formation of COPs can be particularly favored in the presence of light and photosensitizers. This work evaluated the light sensitized cholesterol oxidation in different matrixes (e.g. beef, pork, horse, turkey and sardine muscle). In the retail market, fresh slices of meat or fish are usually displayed in refrigerated vessels wrapped with plastic film and are exposed to a fluorescent light. Under these conditions, COPs can reach the 1.3% of oxidized cholesterol. In order to reduce the oxidative process, different strategies could be used (feeding the animals with antioxidants, or by spraying the muscle food with lipid- or water-soluble antioxidants before packaging). However, the combined use of alternative protective packaging, appropriate lighting conditions and modified atmosphere with low oxygen content, can efficiently prevent photoxidation without modifying the food product composition and sensory properties.

Speaker
Biography:

Ana María Gómez Caravaca is a Rresearcher in the Department of Analytical Chemistry at the University of Granada and Research and Development of Functional Food Centre (CIDAF), Spain. She received her Mmaster degree and PhD degree in Analytical Chemistry at the University of Granada. Afterwards, she developed a Ppostdoctoral stay at the Department of Agricultural and Food Sciences, University of Bologna, Italy. She is co-author of more than 45 research articles in international journals with impact factor. She has more than 8 years’ experience in carrying out R&D projects in the fields of analytical chemistry and food science and technology.

Abstract:

The avocado, Persea americana Miller, is a plant of Lauraceae’s family. The avocado tree is indigenous to tropical America; however, in the last years Spain has increased its production in the Mediterranean area. Avocado pulp contains several bioactive phytochemicals including phenolic compounds. These compounds have demonstrated several health benefits against cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, etc. Because of that, the objective of this study was to determine phenolic compounds in avocado pulp and also its by-products (seed and peel) by using HPLC-DAD-qTOF-MS. Oligomeric pro anthocyanidins were also specifically determined by HPLC-FLD. Total phenolic content by Folin-Ciocalteu and antioxidant activity by ABTS, FRAP and ORAC were also carried out. Pulp phenolic compounds were mostly phenolic acid derivatives (feruloyl and caffeoyl derivatives), whereas seed and pulp mostly presented flavan-3-ol derivatives. Avocado peel showed the highest phenolic content (4406.2 mg/100gd.w.) followed by avocado seed (1676.8mg/100gd.w.) and pulp (71.6mg/100gd.w.). Concerning oligomeric proanthocyanidins, 13 oligomers and the polymer were found. Avocado peel was the fraction that contained the highest amount of this phenolic family. Contrary, avocado pulp showed the lowest content of proanthocyanidins. Antioxidant activity was correlated to phenolic compounds found by HPLC-DAD-qTOF-MS. The present results suggest that avocado pulp is a good source of phenolic acids. Instead, avocado fruit by-products as peel and seed contain high amounts of flavan-3-ols, particularly avocado peel could be used as raw material for the production of nutraceuticals.

Speaker
Biography:

Alicia Gil-Ramirez graduated in two carriers: Biological Sciences and Food Science and Technology, finished a Master in Biology and Food Science and nowadays, she is at the edge of defending her PhD about the hypocholesterolemic compounds of edible mushrooms. Besides her teaching activities, she has published so far 9 scientific articles and a book chapter in indexed journals, participated in more than 10 congresses, co-authored 1 patent and collaborated with the development of other research projects that are being carried out at her institution. She was granted with 2 fellowships to extend her experience in other research institutes in Prague (Czech Republic) and Wageningen (The Netherlands).

Abstract:

The maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis is vital for the human body therefore it is a largely controlled process at several levels (transcriptional, translational, enzyme modulation etc.). If this molecule is not absorbed with the diet, specific receptor senses the lack of the metabolite and activate specific genes and mechanisms to synthetize it. One of the not so well known but important factor in the cholesterol regulation is via thyroid. 3, 3', 5-Triiodothyronine (T3) is a thyroid hormone involved in LDL-r gene expression regulation. A 20% of this hormone is secreted by thyroid but the major amount is produced from thyroxine (T4) by 5´-deiodination in peripheral tissues. This reaction is catalyzed by the selenoprotein deiodinase in (DIO1). This protein activates thyroid hormone by converting the prohormone T4 by outer ring deiodination (ORD) to bioactive T3. It also degrades both hormones by inner ring deiodination (IRD). On the other hand, a few reports indicated that 1 ppm selenium supplementation to rats decreased the total cholesterol and LDL levels, increased DIO1 expression (and T3 levels) and decreased the ApoB and HMGCoA reductase mRNAs expression. Edible mushrooms are a good source of selenium as well as hypocholesterolaemic compounds such as i.e. sterols, fibers, inhibitors of the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-Co A reductase (HMGCR) and of the S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) such as eritadenine. Thus, several mushroom extracts were prepared and administrated to normo-and hypercholesterolaemic mice in order to investigate their potential influence on the Dio1 gene expression in liver, duodenum, ileum and cecum. Results indicated that hypercholesterolemia induced a marked reduction, particularly in liver, of the Dio1 mRNA expression. Moreover, the Dio1 gene expression was also modulated by the mushrooms extracts but not by the hypocholesterolaemic control drugs. Some of the extracts down-regulated its expression while others promoted its up-regulation. The effect was tissue dependent.

Speaker
Biography:

Paulina Elzbieta Wasik is a PhD Student at Matís ohf/Icelandic Food and Biotech Company.

Abstract:

Atlantic mackerel (Scombrus scomber) is a valuable species in the marine industry. Mackerel is known for its widespread relocations and has become an important species in Iceland since 2006, when its catching rate increased. Freezing is the main long term preservation method for mackerel, but it requires optimization suitable for that species in order to maintain the highest quality of the product during prolonged storage. A very important factor that affects quality losses of fish products is storage temperature. Furthermore, some of the most common and harmful changes occurring in fish products are due to lipid oxidation and hydrolysis. The main purpose of this research project was to investigate the effect of different storage temperatures (-18˚C, -25˚C) on the quality of the mackerel during prolonged storage up to 12 months. Evaluation of quality attributes such as gaping, blood spots and peritoneum deterioration was performed on fish fillets. Furthermore, primary and secondary oxidation products, as well as free fatty acids levels (caused by hydrolysis) were analyzed. The results showed continuous increase of lipid deterioration with extended frozen storage of the mackerel. Furthermore, results indicated that lipid oxidation and hydrolysis development was significantly slower in the fish stored at -25˚C compared to fish stored at -18˚C. Additionally, the peritoneum of fish stored at lower temperature was maintained in a better condition and had less muscle gaping. According to the present findings, different storage temperature has a significant effect on the quality of frozen mackerel stored for the long term.

Speaker
Biography:

Marta Munoz Colmenero had a Degree in Biology at the age of 23 years from University of Alcala de Henares (Spain) and acquired the Master in Experimental Techniques Applied to Management and Conservation of Biological Resources from University of Oviedo (Spain). Nowadays, she is in the last year of her PhD studies at the University of Oviedo,within which she spent three months in the University of Southern California(USA). She has participated in five research projects,has published five papers in reputed research journals and has displayed her work in the Congress ECBOL-3 in Belgium and EFFOST-2013 in Italy.

Abstract:

Mislabeling of fish species at landing and along the commercial chain has been detected in manycountries. In the case of hake trade, identification of different species has been and continues to be achallenge. In this work we have analyzed the evolution of commercial hake mislabeling during the lastdecade, focusing on the Spanish market, the world's largest one for hake. DNA-based species identification by PCR amplification and sequencing of mitochondrial genes was carried out in 234 commercial samples. The result was compared with the species stated in the product label, and with 147samples analyzed in previous works. Significant changes were found throughout the decade for theproportion of mislabeled products, with differences between fresh and frozen products and a general decrease in frozen products. Higher mislabeling in unrecognizable versus morphologically recognizable products strongly suggests deliberate fraud. The diversity of substitute species increased significantly inthe period studied, even the non-hake ones. Economic losses for the consumer, estimated from thedifferences in price between the stated species and their substitutes, seemed to decrease in the last years.The results were interpreted in terms of fluctuations in hake prices and annual catch. Since correct identification of fish species is essential to ensure the good management of species and to provide areliable market to the consumers, implementing different control points from the landings to the selling points is indispensable.

Speaker
Biography:

Vahid Farzaneh has started his PhD in September 2013 under the PhD scholarship program entitled Erasmus Mundus funded by EC, at University of Algarve, Faculty of Science and Technology. He started his thesis entitled "Development of nutraceutical and pharmaceutical potentials of 10 selected Portuguese and 10 selected Iranian plants with medicinal properties for application in industries" at that time. He has published 3 papers in International journals (two are on Elsevier) and more than two national journals as well as two authored books (In Persian). Also he has one national patent and more than 10 papers presented in International and National conferences (In Persian).

Abstract:

A liquid infusion obtained by microwave assisted extractions method of Portuguese olive leaves (Olea europaea), with bioactivity potentials was encapsulated by calcium-alginate hydrogels containing starch of potato at three different concentrations (0.5, 1 and 1.5%). On face Central Composite Design (CCD) comprising of ten experimental runs with two replications at the central point was applied and second-order multinomial designs were obtained to characterize the experimental data. Hydrogel beads were assessed for encapsulation efficiency of TPC, TAA and FRAP (three responses) values within 60, 120 and 180 min extraction time. The optimized points, 1.5, 1.091 and 1.5% of starch concentrations within 98.537, 161.620 and 60 min extraction time were achieved respectively for TPC, TAA and FRAP responses. Strong correlation coefficient "0.905, 0.963 and 0.932" respectively between experimental and predicted values of TPC, TAA and FRAP values, as well as significant p value (<0.05) for the selected model and non-significant p value (˃0.05) for lack of fit of all the responses, expressed the fitness of the model handling CCD for optimization of selected independent variables’ effects on release kinetics of bioactive compounds of encapsulated infusions. Obtained results of regression coefficient for linear, interactive and quadratic modes of independent variables, presented various effects of them on each response. Among the observed p value for each mode, just linear modes of both independent variables as well as quadratic mode of starch concentration on TAA value, have indicated significant effects.