Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 16th Euro-Global Summit on Food and Beverages Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Prasanta K. Kalita

University of Illinois, USA

Keynote: Multi-stakeholder approach in reducing global food loss

Time : 10:00-10:35

OMICS International Euro Food-2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Prasanta K. Kalita photo
Biography:

Prasanta Kalita is a professor of Agricultural & Biological Engineering, Director of the ADM Institute for Prevention of Postharvest Loss, and the Associate Dean for Academic Programs in the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences (ACES). He is a Fellow of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineering. His research focuses on the area of water management, hydrology, environmental sustainability, and food security.

 

Abstract:

Meeting the food demand of rapidly increasing global population has been a growing challenge. With limited water availability and other inputs, climate change, and labor shortages, increasing agricultural food production will not be an easy task to meet the food demand of more than 9.5 Billion people by 2050. However, about one third of food produced globally (about 1.3 billion ton) is lost every year. Minimizing postharvest losses (PHL) can be one feasible approach in sustainably increasing food availability, combat hunger, improve health and nutrition, increase farm income, and enhance lives and livelihood of millions. The scale and causes of losses in various operations in the food supply chain are different in developing and developed countries. In developing or low-income countries, these losses occur in terms of physical and quality loss during initial stages of the supply chain such as harvest, drying, cleaning, storage, transportation, milling etc. In the industrialized and developed countries, the food loss occur at the retail or consumption stage in term of “food waste”. Poor management practices, lack of infrastructure and technology, lack of grading at farm level, multiple handling, and poor marketing system are some of the major factors responsible for these losses in the developing countries. Comprehensive and updated information along the postharvest supply chain, including the processes of harvesting, cleaning, drying, storage, processing, transportation and marketing, is needed to plan future capacity building efforts to implement the most appropriate technological solution and best practices for reducing PHL. The ADM Institute (ADMI) for the Prevention of Postharvest Loss has developed multi-stakeholder approach with private corporations, government agencies, educational institutions, NGOs, and philanthropic organizations in combating postharvest losses. The presentation will describe the ADM Institute’s efforts in various countries to reduce these losses through data collection, promoting technology interventions, trainings, and capacity building.

Fig. ADMI village concept in Bihar, India – a collaborative approach to reduce postharvest losses and improve faermers livelihood

  • Symposium on Bacteriophages for healthier foods: Safety by nature

Session Introduction

Alexander Sulakvelidze

Intralytix, Inc., U.S.A.

Title: Bacteriophage biocontrol: Green technology for safer foods
Speaker
Biography:

Alexander Sulakvelidze, Ph.D. is Vice President of R&D and Chief Scientist of Intralytix.  He is an internationally recognized expert in bacteriophages and phage technology.  Dr. Sulakvelidze has published extensively about phage therapy and biocontrol, including co-editing a major book about bacteriophages entitled “Bacteriophages: Biology and Applications”.  He is the author of 14 issued and several pending patents in the field of phage technology.  

Abstract:

Foodborne illnesses of microbial origin continue to be serious food safety problem worldwide.  In addition to being of significant public health importance, the economic impact of foodborne bacterial infections is very significant.  For example, in the USA alone, Salmonella foodborne illnesses result in ca. $2.4 billion in medical costs annually, and hospitalizations and deaths due to E. coli O157:H7 infections lead to an estimated $405 million in medical costs and lost productivity annually.  Also, substantive costs to the food industry are incurred in the form of product loss and brand-damaging publicity associated with recalling products contaminated with pathogenic bacteria.  Thus, there are very strong public health and economic incentives to develop novel approaches for managing contamination of a broad range of foods by specific foodborne bacterial pathogens.  Lytic bacteriophages provide one such approach 

Lytic bacteriophages/phages (viruses that kill bacteria) are the oldest and most ubiquitous microorganisms on Earth.  Because of their potent, highly specific antibacterial activity, phages may provide an all-natural, nontoxic, and effective means for significantly reducing or eliminating bacterial pathogens present in various foods. Several phage-based products have been recently introduced, including ListShield™ - the first ever phage based product (developed by Intralytix, Inc.) to have received FDA approval for direct food applications 5.  These natural phage products, when properly applied, reduce significantly the levels of their bacterial hosts contaminating various foods without altering their flavors, aromas, or appearances.  Bacteriophages represent an emerging “green” technology that can help improve food safety.  The presentations will give the audience an overview of the bacteriophage technology and a current and novel perspective on the crucial technical, regulatory, and human safety issues of this emerging technology for improving food safety.

Speaker
Biography:

Joelle Woolston is a research scientist and laboratory manager at Intralytix, where she provides hands-on research, directs and supervises laboratory staff, and assists in the regulatory approval process.  Prior to joining Intralytix, she worked on metabolic transporters at the Children’s Hospital in Washington, D.C. and co-developed a patented phage-based vector system at the University of Maryland. 

Abstract:

Interest in using bacteriophages to improve food safety has been gaining momentum recently, driven by both the continued occurrence of foodborne outbreaks worldwide and the desire of consumers for natural foods.  Bacteriophages are naturally part of the normal microflora of many foods, and the ‘phage biocontrol’ approach is based on the concept of using the right phage, in the right place, in the right concentration, to control foodborne pathogens.  This approach has been applied to three main areas of food safety: (i) pre-harvest treatment of livestock, (ii) decontamination of inanimate surfaces in the processing environment, and (iii) post-harvest treatment (i.e. direct food applications).  The last type of intervention has perhaps received the most attention, with an increasing number of studies supporting the idea that bacteriophages may provide a safe, environmentally-friendly, and effective approach for improving food safety, by significantly reducing contamination of various foods with specific foodborne bacterial pathogens.

Bacteriophages can reduce levels of the targeted bacterial pathogen on a variety of foods, including, but not limited to, dairy products, fruits and vegetables, and poultry.  This presentation will review the use of bacteriophage biocontrol as a food safety measure, in both human and pet foods, as well as discuss regulatory and safety issues concerning their use.  

Figure 1SalmoLyse® reduces Salmonella contamination on various food surfaces: There was significant reduction in Salmonella on all food surfaces with the addition of SalmoLyse® compared to the controls; A= chicken; B= lettuce; C= tuna; D= cantaloupe; E = ground turkey.

Speaker
Biography:

Andre Senecal received a BA in Biology from Assumption College; a MS in Biological Sciences from Long Island University; and a Ph.D. in Biological Sciences from the University of Rhode Island.  He presently serves as the scientific technical advisor for the Food Protection and Innovative Packaging Team, at the Natick Soldier Research Development and Engineering Center.  In his 29 years at Natick, he has been as a senior research food technologist with responsibilities for advancing military field ration quality, stability, performance, and food safety.  Presently, he is the lead scientist for researching technologies for improving military food safety and detection.  He is a member of the Department of Defense Veterinary Services Activity, Office of the Surgeon General Food Risk Evaluation Committee and Laboratory Working Group where he serves as a technical consultant for food sampling protocols and detection technologies

Abstract:

Foodborne outbreaks involving fresh produce, generally procured locally, is a concern to the United States Military deployed worldwide to countries that lack food sanitation standards and enforcement resulting in an increase potential for food-borne disease outbreaks. Novel natural strategies to eliminate food pathogens on fresh produce are a need for both military and civilian use. An old anti-pathogen technology that has recently emerged as a novel, natural method for improving produce safety is bacteriophages. Bacteriophages are naturally occurring predators of bacteria that reduce the levels of their specifically-targeted pathogenic bacteria. The Army has worked with industry to develop a series of lytic bacteriophage cocktails specific against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella and Shigella. Because phage do not kill 100% of their host, methods were developed where phage was combined with commercial wash treatments to increase the effectiveness of these washes especially in the presences of elevated organic materials. Presently bacteriophage are sold as concentrated, aqueous, phage preparations that must be stored refrigerated (2-8°C) and diluted with clean water prior to application. Due to the cost of shipping liquid products around the world, the Army recently has investigated strategies for drying and increasing the shelf-life of phage cocktails at room temperature. Electrospinning and freeze drying studies with different excipients were conducted and demonstrated potential promise for storing phage at room temperature for extended periods.

Fig. Effect of temperature (20°C, 4°C,-20°C) on bacteriophage viability after 8 weeks of storage at 1% RH.  All data points are calculated mean values (n=6) with error bars representing the standard deviations.

  • Oral Session
Speaker
Biography:

Withida Chantraponchai is an assistant professor at the Department of Product Development, Faculty of Agro-Industry, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand. She studies Food Science at University of Massachusetts at Amherst, USA.  At Kasetsart university, she is responsible in teaching color evaluation and sensory evaluation.  Her current research interests are development of natural colorants from local produces and their applications; and influence of food additives on sensory characteristics of food products. 

Abstract:

Anthocyanins are compounds extracted from natural origins, and can be used as a natural colorant. The high anthocyanin corn hybrid Kasetsart Purple Corn Single Cross (KPSC) 901 (Zea mays L.) is a new purple corn single cross-hybrid in Thailand. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Anthocyanin extraction from KPSC 901 purple corn cob by new extraction methods, including microwave-assisted, ultrasound-assisted and ohmic heating techniques were studied and compared with the conventional heating method (solid : liquid ratio = 1:20) to select the best method for upscaling extraction. The extract was later concentrated and freeze-dried before quantity analysis. Findings: The optimal process for anthocyanin extraction was microwave-assisted extraction which gave a total anthocyanin content (TAC) of 397.1 mg/100 g corn cob powder. The extract powder had TAC and total phenolics content values of 3,446 and 20,915 mg/100 g powder, respectively. Conclusion & Significance: In this research, microwave-assisted extraction is the optimized method, which can help to efficiently extract anthocyanins and phenolic compounds from purple corn cob by using only water as a solvent for producing colorant powder. The powder dissolved in water and had a deep red color so it could be used in functional foods as a natural colorant and/or a source of active ingredients, depending on the concentration used.

Speaker
Biography:

Yui Sunano has received her Ph.D. of Area Studies (Africa) from Graduate School of Asian and African Area Studies (ASAFAS), Kyoto University in March, 2014. She continued her research at ASAFAS and Graduate School of Agriculture as a researcher until March, 2015. From April to October, 2015, she worked as a project researcher at Research Institute for Humanity and Nature, Kyoto. Currently, she is a specially appointed assistant professor at Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University and engaged in “Woman Leaders Program to Promote Well-being in Asia” designed to solve problems in Asia and develop women leaders.

Abstract:

Drinking alcoholic beverages has always been a part of human history since ancient times. In the Western countries, however, due to the increase in accidents, violent incidents and disease risks attributing to intoxication caused by drinking alcoholic beverages particularly in the 19th to 20th centuries, drinking had come to be recognized as problematic and even evil. Nevertheless, the theories presented by the medical scientists Michael Marmot and Arthur Klatsky in 1981 that moderate drinking was beneficial to health denied the interpretation, which have been further supported by similar research results. Nowadays, it is commonly understood that drinking alcoholic beverages can do both good and harm based on the intake amount and patterns of drinking. Since early days, people have been consuming alcoholic beverages for a variety of reasons: a medical remedy for health, a social tool to make a successful relationship via moderate drunkenness, and a cultural purpose to induce a state of trance for rituals or ceremonies. Such various drinking patterns for various purposes are often observed in the regions where alcoholic beverages are locally and traditionally produced and consumed.
 
In multiethnic Ethiopia, North East Africa and Nepal, East Asia, each ethnic group produces a wide range of local alcoholic beverages, and their brewing methods, usages and effects are also varied. This presentation focuses on brewing methods of local alcoholic beverages and patterns of drinking of the Dirashe people living in southern Ethiopia and the Newar people in Kathumandu Valley and the Gurung people in the Pokhara area in Nepal, and aims at examining how people develop locally distinctive cultures of drinking.
Figure 1. making alchol beverage in nepal
 

Speaker
Biography:

Voltaire Sant’Anna is graduated in food engineering (Brazil) and is PhD in Chemical Engineering (Brazil) and has experience on food science and technology. Dr. Sant’Anna has worked with food engineering focusing on kinetics of thermal inactivation and reutilization of industrial food residues.

Abstract:

Pinhão is a starch-rich seed produced by Araucaria angustifoliaPinhão seed coat is as a byproduct generated in both households and farms, presenting great potential as source of natural food preservatives. The objective of this study was to evaluate total polyphenol content, antioxidant, antimicrobial and bioherbicidal properties of the residue. For this aim, pinhão seeds were cooked and peeled, and their coat were dried at 60ºC for 24h. Dried residue was crushed in industrial blender and sifted. Total polyphenol content and ABTS scavenging activity were evaluated using an aqueous extract from dried residue powder, at a concentration of 10 and 5gL-1Pinhão seed coat extracts were also tested against pathogenic bacteria, phytopathogenic fungi and for lettuce seed germination through in vitro tests. The polyphenol analysis revealed that pinhão seed coat extract presents 53.8 mg GAE g-1 and the ABTS scavenging activity was 76.1%. The residue extract caused a decrease in seed germination and reduced the germination seed index when used in concentrations of up to 5gL-1, although it did not interfere the germinated plant root size. Additionally, the pinhão seed coat extract presented antibacterial activity against Bacillus cereusListeria monocytogenesListeria innocua and Staphylococcus aureus, but showed no anti-fungal activity. Thus, aqueous extract of pinhão seed coat can be an interesting alternative to be used as natural antibacterial and herbicide, also representing a way of solid waste management by industries and small farmers.

 

Figure. Pinhão seed coat extract presents antioxidant, antibacterial and herbicidal activities.

Speaker
Biography:

Guillermo Rodríguez Gutiérrez is currently working as a researcher in the Food Phytochemistry Department, belonging to the Instituto de la Grasa (Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)). He is an expert in agro-food industry by-products valorization by extraction of bioactives compounds after thermal treatments. Her work has made possible the commercialization of the more active phenols in olive from olive oil wastes. He is a vice president of the International Association of Mediterranean Agro-industrial Wastes (IAMAW). Author of more than 47 articles in high impact factor journals (SCI) (h index=16), 4 book chapters, principal investigator of two international research projects an one national, and co-inventor of 9 national and international patent, 5 in exploitation, co-director of 4 PhD thesis in Chemical. 

Abstract:

Secondary varieties of non-commercial Tunisian dates were thermally treated by steam for its valorization. After the treatment, two phases, liquid and solid, were obtained and characterized. Sugars and phenols were solubilized to the liquid phase remaining an interesting fiber with antioxidant capacity in the solid. The concentration of phenols and the antioxidant activity were increased by the severity of the treatments in the liquid, up to 5311 mg of total phenols/Kg of fresh dates, and up to 62.5 mmol Trolox®/Kg of fresh date, respectively. Additionally, a long scale study was carried out in a pilot plant with steam treatment at 140 and 160 ºC for 30 minutes. The liquid phase was extracted and fractionated chromatographically using adsorbent or ionic resins. The phenolic profiles was determined for each fraction, yielding fractions with interesting antioxidant activities up to EC50 values of 0.08 mg/L or values of TEAC of 0.67 mmol Trolox®/g of extract. In the solid fraction a fiber concentrates (DFC) was obtained by treatments at 165 and 180C and evaluated as a source of antioxidant dietary fiber. A bakery product like muffins was prepared with 2.5 and 5% flour substitution with DFCs. The DFC-doughs presented a similar yield to the control but the muffins reached a lower volume. The texture did not increase with the density. In fact, the muffins with DFC obtained by the treatment at 165ºC were the softest tested, although they had lower cohesiveness and springiness. The proximate composition was similar among samples. The DFC-muffins had higher antioxidant capacity than the control, and obtained good scores in the sensory evaluation. Thus, the thermal treatment leads to obtain a valuable liquid rich in sugars and antioxidant phenols, and a solid rich in antioxidant fiber that can be used as a functional ingredient for baked goods.

Speaker
Biography:

Luis Fernando Schrötter da Silva is graduated in Food Science and technology and presents scientific publications on utilization of food industry residue for agricultural applications.

Abstract:

The objective is to develop a bread with grape flour incorporation into conventional wheat flour and evaluate the effect of the substitution in technological, sensory and nutritional properties. To this end, breads were prepared with wheat flour added of concentrations of 0.1g/g 0.2g/g of grape marc powder, being evaluated the bread size, mass, total phenolics and antioxidant activity. Sensorial analysis was also performed to evaluate the product acceptance. The results indicate that the incorporation grape flour to wheat flour does not change (p> 0.05) the height, width, depth and weight of the rolls. The concentration of phenolic compounds significantly increased (p <0.05) due to the presence of the grape flour products. The incorporation of grape flour in the formulation of bread increased (p<0.05) its antioxidant activity as measured radical ABTS sequestration capacity and iron chelator power. The products produced with white flour and mixed with 0.1g/g of grape flour showed no sequestering ability to DPPH, while those with 0.2g / g of dry matter had ability to scavenge radicals of 7%. As for the reducing power, increasing grape flour concentration resulted in an increase (p<0.05) in antioxidant activity as measured by the method. The results of sensory evaluation indicate that the tasters had greater acceptance of color and appearance (p<0.05) of the breads prepared with the white flour than those incorporated with grape marc powder. For aroma, texture, flavor and overall acceptance there was no difference (p> 0.05) on the acceptance of the elaborate formulations. Thus, the addition of grape marc powder to bread formulation does not change the technological characteristics of the products and increases their antioxidant properties. As for the sensory analysis, it is observed that the products with grape flour have similar acceptance to the product without its incorporation.

Figure. Bread incorporated with grape marc powder presents higher polyphenol content.

Speaker
Biography:

Evzen Sarka finished his PhD.  at the University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology in 1976, Assoc. Prof. since 2012. Research interest: sugar and starch technology, image analysis measurement; modeling processes in carbohydrate technologies, biodegradable plastics, starch modification, starch digestibility. Prof. Sarka is a member of ICUMSA (International Commission for Uniform Methods of Sugar Analysis) and of ESST (European Society of Sugar Technologists), and of the Scientific Committee of the International Conference on Polysaccharides-Glycoscience held in Prague.

Abstract:

As to human nutrition, starch in food may be generally divided to rapidly digestible (RDS), slowly digestible (SDS) or resistant starch (RS).  RDS is degraded to glucose in 20 min after enzymatic activity; SDS is changed into glucose while being digested in the small intestine for up to 120 min. The RS passes into the colon, where it is metabolised into secondary products (short chain fatty acids, SCFSa) by colonic microflora and behaves in a way similar to dietary fibre.  SDS has beneficial physiological effect on the reduction of post-prandial glycemic responses. The SCFAs coming from RS are known as the main nutrient of the colonocyte and a lack of butyrate would increase the risk for some colonic diseases.

The purpose of this study is to describe the experience of increasing SDS and RS in food together with the impact on sensory properties.  Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Based on the literature data the study was focused on laboratory extrusion cooking, and on dough fermentation and baking of bread. The additives were amylose, wheat and pea starch, chemically modified starches and starch from amylomaize. Findings: High RS content in extrudates and bread was observed for amylose, pea starch and starch from amylomaize. But also water addition, compression ratio of the screw and temperature regime was important for high SDS and RS content in extrudates. The stiffness and volume of the bread was worse when compared with the reference and depended on the added amount. Conclusion & Significance: The recommended daily intake of RS may be satisfied after 5-10 % addition of starch from amylomaize into the dough. It is also useful the application of legumes to increase SDS and RS in food.

Speaker
Biography:

Faiza Mahboub is Assistant Professor of Histology And Histopathology at Umm Al-Qura University , Faculty of Applied Science, Department of Biology, she conduct her researches related to Alternative Medicine and Cancer Research, she owned her master  degree entitled Histological and Histochemical Effect of Anticancer Drug (Cyclophosphamide) on the Ovary of Albino Mice. And PhD. degree entitled The Effect of Green Tea on the Ovarian Cancer Cells (In Vitro and In Vivo Studies). In addition, she is conducting numerous research related to alternative modalities in cancer and other disease.

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Abstract:

In Egypt, liver diseases are one of the most prominent killers especially hepatitis virus infection, fibrosis and cirrhosis. Hepatitis has a serious health effects and alter the functions of the liver. D-galactosamine (D-GalN) and Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced hepatitis in rats are  closely resembling human viral hepatitis. Propolis is honey bee product with a wide range of beneficial therapeutic effects. To evaluate the possible protective effect of propolis on experimentally induced hepatitis in adult male albino rats. Forty adult male rats included and divided equally into 4 groups (10 rats each). group I (control group), group II (Propolis group): The rats received daily oral dose of the propolis (200mg/Kg) by gastric tube for 2 weeks, group III (Hepatitis model group): The rats received single intraperitoneally injection of D-GalN and LPS (300 mg/kg and 30 μg/kg) 18 hours before the end of experiment, group IV (Propolis and hepatitis model group): The rats received daily oral dose of propolis for 2 weeks and D-GalN and LPS 18 hours before the end of experiment. Liver specimens were taken and processed for histological and immunohistochemical study. Group III showed signs of degeneration and necrosis as some swollen hepatocytes had finely granular cytoplasm, other hepatocytes had small hyperchromatic or karyolytic nuclei. Dilated congested, proliferation of endothelial cells of central vein was seen and its wall showed inflammatory cells. There were apparent  increase of collagen fibers, significant increase of anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) positive nuclei among hepatocytes and strong immunoreaction for anti-Transforming growth factor (TGF-β1) in the wall of portal vein. Group IV showed improvement of histological and immunohistochemical changes described before. Propolis has potential protective effect against D-GalN/LPS induced hepatotoxicity in rats as it has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic activities.