Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 9th Euro-Global Summit & Expo on Food & Beverages Cologne, Germany.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

TBA

Keynote: TBA

Time : 10:50 - 11:15

Conference Series Euro Food-2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker TBA photo
Biography:

Abstract:

Keynote Forum

TBA

Keynote: TBA

Time : 10:25-10:50

Conference Series Euro Food-2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker TBA photo
Biography:

Abstract:

Keynote Forum

TBA

Keynote: TBA

Time : 10:25-10:50

Conference Series Euro Food-2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker TBA photo
Biography:

Abstract:

  • Symposium on "Sustainable Food Production: A Technological Approach to Reduce Water and Energy Consumption in Dairy Industry"

Session Introduction

Christoph Glanser

Fraunhofer Institute (UMSICHT), Germany

Title: The green dairy model: A technology and innovation-driven approach for sustainable milk processing

Time : 10:00-10:25

Speaker
Biography:

Christoph Glasner is working as a Senior Scientist at Fraunhofer Institute for Environmental, Safety, and Energy Technology UMSICHT. He has completed his studies of Mechanical Engineering with a specialization in Process Engineering in 2005. He got his PhD in the field of oil filtration with several separation/membrane technologies in 2009. The PhD thesis was carried out within the framework of 2 FP6 EU projects that he was managing (TRANSMAN, SAFELUBE). Since 2009, he is the Senior Scientist at UMSICHT in the field of biomass conversion and water treatment/management in combination with heat recovery. Currently, he is responsible for international projects in the field of food processing and biomass utilization.

Abstract:

The main idea of the collaborative project “SUSMILK: Re-design of the dairy industry for sustainable milk processing” is to analyze and optimize the whole process chain for milk and milk products with regard to energy and water consumption. The project aims at developing new concepts and technologies for the supply of heat, cold and power and integrating them into the respective process steps. A central part of the project is the integration of innovative and efficient technologies into a green dairy concept that will aim at maximizing water and energy savings. Main objectives include: application of new technologies for heat generation and distribution in dairies; adaption of new chilling technologies; application of membrane filtration techniques for an innovative pre-concentration of milk; development of new concepts for low temperature drying of milk; optimizing/classifying of waste-stream treatments for water savings and/or energy production; testing of all technologies and concepts in pilot applications under real life conditions; LCA of the entire dairy food chain and development of a decision making tool for more competitive and green dairy plants and; energy-based analysis to show the full potential of energy and water savings within the dairy industry. Expected results include: The evaluation of the feasibility, efficiency, and economy of the technology developments to reduce the water and energy demand in the dairy to establish a resource efficient food processing; concepts based on research results to highlight the potential for recycling of energy and mass flows by transforming waste flows into valuable products and; a green dairy simulation tool based on all the data generated within the different pilot and demonstration plants, which will help engineers and the dairy industry to design new and to adapt existing facilities

Speaker
Biography:

Ana Lucia Vásquez-Caicedo obtained MSc in Food Science and Technology from University of Arkansas (USA) and a PhD from University of Hohenheim (Germany). She has experience on product and process development in the fruit and vegetables, bakery, dairy and the beverage sectors. She has joined Fraunhofer IGB in 2009 and leads the group “Aseptic Technologies” focusing on process development for the stabilization of foods and manufacturing of cosmetic ingredients. Her experience includes development of innovative processes and their integration into established manufacturing processes, conducting risk analyses and evaluating the impact of introducing new technologies.

Abstract:

With 13% of the total European Food and Drink industry turnover, the dairy industry is considered one of the most important sub-sectors as well as and one of the highest energy and water consumers, both overall and per unit production: up to 6.47MWh (5.55MWhth and 0.92 MWhel) and an average of 2m3 of water per ton processed milk. The production of milk powder and other dairy powder products in the EU has risen continually in recent years due to increased export demand, thus having a major impact on overall water and energy consumption in EU dairies. Therefore, the whole processing line of these products was analyzed and hot spots identified. Pre-heating of concentrates (45-52% solids) and/or viscous products like yogurt and quark prior spray drying remain one of the major challenges due to the formation of fouling and burn-on, which impacts on product quality and creates costs associated with downtime for cleaning and maintenance. Accordingly, microwave pre-heating technology has been identified as a promising alternative to indirect heating using plate heat-exchangers or tubular heaters. Current experiments with quark, a fresh cheese-like a micro-gel suspension, have shown no fouling formation and homogeneous product quality enabling longer processing times and substantial reduction of cleaning efforts. Additionally, rapid microwave pre-heating to a temperature inlet of 50°C increased spray dryer throughput by 11%. Presently, studies on overall energy consumption with an integrated microwave pre-heating unit are being conducted at an industrial site.

Speaker
Biography:

Pieter Debrauwer obtained his MSc in Aerospace Engineering at Delft University of Technology and is currently working as Program Manager at TNO in the field of 3D printing. He is involved in R&D projects both in EU as well as in contract research. One of the spin-outs of 3D printing is the use of mono-disperse atomizing for spray drying. He is the Coordinator of the Enthalpy project which brings multiple innovative technologies to the dairy processing, which should lead to a reduction of energy use by 60%.

Abstract:

The Enthalpy project is an European FP-7 project, which overall objective is to significantly reduce energy and water consumption in the European dairy industry, by 63% and 18% respectively. This will lead to increased competitiveness in the dairy sector. To achieve this, innovations are introduced and existing technologies are adapted. These investigated innovations are mono-disperse atomising, radio-frequency heating for the pasteurisation step, membrane distallation in the feed line, membrane contactor on the exhaust of the spray dryer, solar thermal energy for reheating the drying air and enzymatic cleaning of all processing units. Besides introducing these innovative units also a process systems engineering approach is implemented to optimese the processing plant as a whole instead of optimising individual units. These innovations are validated on labscale and will be demonstrated at a pilot plant to show the potential of upscaling these technologies to production units. Next to the sustainability aspects of these developments also the impact on the product quality is investigated, because at a minimum the same product quality needs to be obtained. While the project aims at the dairy industry the technologies have a wider applicability and can result in significant improvements in different sectors.

Speaker
Biography:

Vicenc Puig has completed his Telecommunications Engineering degree in 1993 and PhD degree in Automatic Control, Vision, and Robotics in 1999, both from Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC). He is a Professor at the Automatic Control Department and a Researcher at the Institut de Robòtica i Informàtica Industrial, both from the UPC. He is the Chair of the Automatic Control Department and Head of the research group in Advanced Control Systems at UPC. He has developed important scientific contributions in the areas of fault diagnosis and fault tolerant control using interval and linear-parameter-varying models using setbased approaches. He has participated in more than 20 European and national research projects in the last decade. He has also led many private contracts with several companies and has published more than 100 journal articles and more than 400 in international conference/workshop proceedings. He has supervised over 15 PhD dissertations and over 40 Master’s theses/final projects.

Abstract:

In this presentation, a methodology for the global process management of the milk and yogurt production processes used as a case study in the European project EnReMilk will be described. At the beginning, three strategies were considered taking into account several aspects of the process management, namely: safety management, production optimization and system optimization. After analyzing the three strategies, the consortium of project agreed to focus on the development of the production optimization. The production optimization problem addresses the optimal batch scheduling of a real power milk/ yoghurt process by means of a constraint programming approach. First, the process and production rules are modeled using a set of constraints. Then, an objective function that includes the process optimization criteria is defined. After the definition of the constraints and objective function, an optimization problem that is formulated and solved using a constraint programming solver, namely the IBM ILOG Optimization Studio. A set of scenarios changing the consume ratio of evaporators, that consider an uninterrupted 15 full days in the underlying powdered milk and yogurt production facilities, are presented to illustrate the validity and performance of the proposed approach.

Salima Varona Iglesias

Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology, Germany

Title: Continuous non-thermal high pressure process for skimmed raw milk stabilization

Time : 11:55-12:20

Speaker
Biography:

Salima Varona Iglesias has completed her Degree in Chemical Engineering and PhD in Process and System Engineering from the University of Valladolid (Spain). Afterwards, she worked as a Post-Doctoral Researcher at the School in advanced optical technologies (SAOT) from the Erlangen-Nurnberg Friedrich- Alexander University, working on high pressure formulation process and its in-line monitoring. She joined FhG in 2013 as a scientist of the research group Aseptic Systems at the Department of Physical Process Technology. Her main research field covers beverages stabilization using high pressure, selective separation process and process intensification. She has experience in EC and national project management.

Abstract:

Thermal pasteurization is the standard stabilization method used in raw milk, however alternative non-thermal methods are demanded not only to protect sensory and nutritional properties, but also for reducing energy and water consumptions. In the present study, the suitability of using the pressure change technology (PCT) which uses inert gases (N2 and Ar) for the treatment of milk was investigated. Performance trials were carried out on a continuous PCT system treating skimmed raw milk with an initial total bacterial plate count (TBPC) of 5.4 log CFU/ml at different operation conditions. TBPC and pH were analyzed before and directly treatment and variations were monitored during six days of cold storage (5-7°C). Results show that TBPC of the skimmed raw milk was reduced by 1.39 log direct after the PCT treatment and maintained during 6 days. The pH was monitored during the 6 days of storage shifting from 6.1 to 5.1. The TBPC in the PCT treated samples changed from 4.08 log (day 1) to 4.20 CFU/ml after 6 days of storage. In both of cases, microbial load remained below the minimum accepted microbial load level (4.47 log CFU/ml) established by the EC standards. It was concluded; that PCT treated skim milk can be stored for few days as an intermediate product in dairy plants or used for the production of cheese or other dairy products. This case study as well demonstrated that using the PCT technology energy and water consumptions can be reduced by up to 50% in comparison with classical pasteurization.

Speaker
Biography:

Reinhard Kohlus is full time Professor for “food process engineering and powder technology” at the University of Hohenheim in Stuttgart, Germany. His background is process engineering particularly particle technology. His working experiments includes several positions at Unilever B. V., both in research and development, dealing with products like dry soups, seasonings, bouillons and instant-drinks. Particularly research interests include spray drying, agglomeration and coating technologies, behavior of dry food products that mean all low aw products, the generation and optimization of in use properties of these products as well as structure analysis of granulated or otherwise structured powders.

Abstract:

EnReMilk aims at significant water and energy savings in representative dairy case studies, mozzarella and milk powder production, across the supply chain. The dairy industry is an important food industry sector with sales of €124.3 billion and added value of €17.4 billion p.a. It is a high energy and water consumer, both overall and per unit production. 98% of the fresh water used is of drinking water quality with 80% of energy consumed in process heating, pasteurization, sterilization, drying and cleaning operations. The case studies of a novel Mozzarella process and skim milk powder production by spray drying will show approaches and results on technology based water consumption savings and reduced energy requirements respectively. In Mozzarella production, a continuous process has been developed based on understanding of rheological behavior and structuring of cheese curd. The technology will be presented and placed in the broader context of the total production process. Reduction in energy consumption in the spray drying process is tackled especially by super-heated steam drying. This process has proven to allow the reutilization of the latent heat of evaporation. The specific use in spray drying of dairy products has particular aspects due to the heat sensitivity of the product. Energy balance, specific benefits, issues and draw backs will be presented as well as reference results from alternative pilot plant spray drying approaches and placed in the context of production results.

  • Special Session on "The Importance of Minerals from Bottled Waters

Session Introduction

Ingegerd Rosborg

Miljo Naringsbalans Vatten, Sweden

Title: The Importance Of Minerals From Bottled Waters

Time : 12:45-13:30

Speaker
Biography:

Ingegerd Rosborg has completed her PhD from Lund University and performed additional studies and projects at both Lund University, Sweden, and KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. She has been working as a Nutrient Therapist, Drinking Water Analyst and Health Evaluator at her company Miljö Näringsbalans Vatten (Environment Nutrient Balance Water) since 2000. She has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and in COST Action 637, “Metals and related substances in drinking water”. She is an IWA specialist group Swedish representative.

Abstract:

The study from 2002 presents the concentrations of about 50 metals and ions in 33 different brands of bottled waters on the Swedish market. Ten of the brands showed calcium (Ca) concentrations <10 mg L/1 and magnesium (Mg) levels <3 mg L/1; origin primary rock bedrock. Three of these had low concentrations of sodium (<7 mg L/1), potassium (<3 mg L/1) and bicarbonate (<31 mg L/1). Contrary, water with high concentrations can substantially contribute to the daily intake of elements. Nine of the brands were collected from limestone regions. They showed Ca-levels >50 mg L/1, maximum of 289 mg L/1. Mg-levels were >90 mg L/1 in two brands. Two waters were supplemented with Na2CO3 and NaCl, resulting in elevated Na (644 and 648 mg L/1) and chloride (204 and 219 mg L/1). Such water types may make a substantial contribution to the daily intake of NaCl in high water consumers. The storage of carbonated drinking water in aluminum (Al) cans increased the Al-concentration to about 70 lg L/1. The levels of Fe (iron) and Mn (manganese) and potentially toxic metals were generally low. Nowadays bottled waters are more and more RO (Reverse Osmosis) treated, causing completely de-mineralized waters, comparable to distilled or rain water. Acute symptoms from drinking many liters of RO water are decreased electrolyte levels causing tiredness, weakness, headache, trembling, coma, and brain edema. In the long run; acidosis, with increased risk for cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis and diabetes etc., is a great risk.

  • Track 1: Sustainable Food & Beverages Track 3: Fermentation and process equipment Track 5: Food and Beverages Packaging Track 7: Hurdle Technology

Session Introduction

Ingegerd Rosborg

Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden

Title: The importance of minerals from bottled waters
Speaker
Biography:

Ingegerd Rosborg has completed her PhD at the age of 55 years from Lund University and performed additional studies and projects at both Lund University, Sweden, and KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. She has been working as nutrient therapist and drinking water analysts and health evaluator at her company Miljö Näringsbalans Vatten (Environment Nutrient Balance Water) since year 2000. She has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and has been COST Action 637, “Metals and related substances in drinking water”, and IWA specialist group Swedish representative.

Abstract:

The study from 2002 presents the concentrations of about 50 metals and ions in 33 different brands of bottled waters on the Swedish market. Ten of the brands showed calcium (Ca) concentrations <10 mg L/1 and magnesium (Mg) levels <3 mg L/1; origin primary rock bedrock. Three of these had low concentrations of sodium ( <7 mg L/1), potassium (<3 mg L/1) and bicarbonate ( <31 mg L/1). Contrary, water with high concentrations can substantially contribute to the daily intake of elements. Nine of the brands were collected from limestone regions. They showed Ca-levels > 50 mg L/1, maximum of 289 mg L/1. Mg-levels were >90 mg L/1 in two brands. Two waters were supplemented with Na2CO3 and NaCl, resulting in elevated Na (644 and 648 mg L/1) and chloride (204 and 219 mg L/1). Such waters may make a substantial contribution to the daily intake of NaCl in high water consumers. The storage of carbonated drinking water in aluminum (Al) cans increased the Al-concentration to about 70 lg L/1. The levels of Fe (iron) and Mn (manganese) and potentially toxic metals were generally low. Nowadays bottled waters are more and more RO (Reverse Osmosis) treated, causing completely de-mineralized waters, comparable to distilled or rain water. Acute symptoms from drinking many Liters of RO water are decreased electrolyte levels causing tiredness, weakness, headache, trembling, coma, and brain edema. In the long run; acidosis, with increased risk for cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, diabetes etc is a great risk.

Speaker
Biography:

Grimsby has worked as a senior project manager at Nofima from 2006, coordinating EU projects as well as projects supported by various national founding agents. Grimsby had been accepted as a PhD candidate at the University of Oslo with his theses; “How does the Norwegian food industry act during innovation processes? -A study on new product failure rate and systematic differences between successful and unsuccessful innovation projects in the food industry.

Abstract:

Test sale through online grocery stores opens up for better consumer insights. A European FP7 SME research project named “Increased utilization and consumption of barley for better health” with the acronym BARLEYboost, tested new fiber enriched barleybread in order to develop a new cost efficient method for real-life testing of minimum viable food products (mvp’s). The experiment was conducted through the online grocery store www.kolonial.no in 2015. Free samples were handed out to known costumers with and without approved health claims, printed on the products. The health claim “Maintenance of normal blood cholesterol concentrations” due to its high on fiber from beta-glucan content, referred to at least 1g/meal as a necessary daily dose of 3g/day. The experiment indicated that health claims printed on the product had no significant effect on increased sales of barleybread. Mapping consumer behavior using big data technics at online stores, opens up for a new way of rapid prototyping with validated learning for the food industry. By studying behavior of barleybread consumers vs. average costumers, at the online grocery store, using social network analyzing methods, we find new patterns of consumers enabling us to group consumers in new segments. This will help us in more efficient mvp experiments for maximum learning, during new product development, in a new cost-efficient experimental design.

Suzana Caetano da Silva Lannes

Associate professor, Sau Paulo University, Brazil

Title: Quality and application of oils obtained from some brazilian species

Time : 14:25-14:50

Speaker
Biography:

Suzana Caetano da Silva Lannes is Associate Professor at Pharmaceutical Sciences School at University of São Paulo. She is President of Brazilian Society of Food Science and Technology-sbCTA, and Vice President of Brazilian Association of Rheology. She has published papers in reputed journals, book chapters, and has been serving as Editor in Chief of Food Science and Technology-CTA Journal. Develop research works in the Food Science and Technology area, on the following subjects: rheology, physics of foods, development of special and nutritional food formulations and study of fats and some fat foods.

Abstract:

Brazil has considerable territorial peculiarities and plant species diversities, sometimes from the same botanical family. The fruits can exhibit significant differences in properties of the oils extracted. As example can be cited Brazil Nut (Bertholletia excelsa), Sapucaia nuts (Lecythis pisonis camb.), Amazonas tucumã (Astrocaryum aculeatum Meyer), Pará tucumã (Astrocaryum vulgare Mart.), Chicha (Sterculia striata), Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) among other. The raw materials of great relevance, as oils from seed and pulp, have been widely investigated due to its lipid content and potential application, fatty acid profile, and bioactive compounds. The extration process can interfere in some properties of the obtained oils, as quantity and quality of their unsaturation profile, directly influencing the nutritional quality of these oil, for example, with regards to quantitatively unsaturated fatty acids, as well as total carotenes. Thermal analysis has been used in studies on thermal decomposition, moisture determination, volatile compounds, thermal oxidation, reaction kinetics, crystallization, phase diagrams, specific heat determination, vitreous transition determination, storage time determination. And it can be useful to characterize the properties of the oils and fat foods. Oils are responsible for performing varied and important functions in the body, such as providing calories, essential fatty acids and fat soluble vitamins, and are considered very important among the ingredients and the sensory aspects of the functional properties of the food. The final characteristics of processed fat products depend on the physical and chemical properties of oils and fats present in their formulation.

Speaker
Biography:

Romdhane Karoui obtained his PhD in Food Science in 2004 from Blaise Pascal University (France) and his accreditation to supervise research in 2009. Between 2009 and 2010, he was the Senior Research Scientist at Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech (Belgium). He has a long-term scientific experience in the fields of Spectroscopic methods (VIS, NIR, MIR, fluorescence) for the determination of the quality of several food products. He is the author of 75 peer-reviewed scientific papers and more than 80 proceedings, book contributions and reviews. He is serving as an Editorial Board Member of several journals in Food Science. He is currently working as a Professor at the Artois University and Director of the research team of Food Quality and Security Site-Artois of Charles Viollette Institute.

Abstract:

Food adulteration has been practiced since a long time and sophisticated foods have increased in the last years. Foods and ingredients presenting high-value are the most vulnerable for adulteration. Determination of food authenticity and detection of adulteration have become an important question in quality control and safety of food products. Indeed, consumer awareness has increased about food quality and safety, geographical origin and agricultural. The replacement of original substance partially or completely with more easily available and cheap substance is the most common procedure performed by defrauders. Although the physico-chemical analyses are promising techniques to determine the authenticity of food products, they are time consuming and use several pollutant reagents. For these reasons, there is a need to develop rapid, inexpensive and efficient analytical methods for the detection of frauds and authentication of food products. Recently, more attention has been paid to the development of noninvasive and non-destructive techniques such as infrared, fluorescence, and so on. These techniques are fast, of relatively low cost, environmentally friendly, and provide a great deal of information with only one test, making them suitable for on-line and/or at-line process control. In addition, the above-mentioned techniques often require little or no sample preparation and are relatively easy to operate. The aim of the present study was to determine the potential of mid infrared and fluorescence methods combined with multivariate statistical analyses as fingerprints allowing authenticating different food products.

Carola Seybold

Director, X-Rite GmbH, Germany

Title: How color can influence the success story of your food company

Time : 15:15-15:40

Speaker
Biography:

Carola Seybold has completed her Diploma at the age of 24 years from Lake of Constance University (GRMY) and further finalized her Marketing studies from University of Hohenheim (GRMY). Before joining PANTONE LLC in 2008, Seybold has worked as a Senior Consultant at Glasmeier & Partner Int. She works as the Director of Business Development for PANTONE LLC in Europe, Middle East and Africa and leading also the Marketing in PANTONE EMEA.

Abstract:

Have your ever make up your mind, how important it is to have the right, consistent color for your produced food? Do you know, that also color trends influencing the consumer purchase behavior in food? Learn from different case studies, what are the challenges and risks in color selection, color development and color sustainability. PANTONE will introduce you, how color perception is working, which colors have which meaning for food and how colors can be controlled in a global production process.

Felix Schmollgruber

X-Rite Europe GmbH, Switzerland

Title: Colorize your flavor - Color measurement for food

Time : 15:40-16:05

Speaker
Biography:

Felix Schmollgruber studied printing and media technology at the University of Applied Sciences in Munich Germany and started his professional career in June 2001 at GretagMacbeth, Germany accepting the challenge to explore industrial color management in a variety of industries. After six successful years as field sales manager at both GretagMacbeth and X-Rite he moved into the European headquarters of the freshly merged company in Switzerland to serve as technical support engineer and trainer in order to help customers implementing and troubleshooting X-Rite solutions. Today he leads the group of application- and technical support specialists for X-Rite’s EMEA territory.

Abstract:

Human nature judges the quality of food visually prior to smelling or tasting. Nevertheless color measurement of food specimen presents a number of challenges given the physical properties of certain products, like samples changing when in contact with an instrument, the instrument contaminating etc. This lecture will cover the basics of color measurement, available technologies to overcome the obstacles of food specific problems with traditional measurement devices and how to establish repeatable and representative characterization and specification of food color. Furthermore success stories of food processors best practices in regards to color will be presented.

Oya Bozdag Dundar

Ankara University, Turkey

Title: Anticancer activity mechanisms of flavonoids

Time : 16:30-16:55

Speaker
Biography:

Oya Bozdag Dundar has completed her PhD from Ankara University in 1998. She is a full Professor at the same department since 2009. She has been lecturing to BSc, MSc and PhD students in Ankara University, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry. She published 59 articles and is interested with drug design and synthesis of heterocyclic compounds having antidiabetic, aldose-reductase enzyme inhibitory, antioxidant, histone deacetylase enzyme inhibition, bromodomain inhibitors and anticancer activities.

Abstract:

Flavonoids are a vast group of heterogeneous polyphenols with various health benefits, derived from secondary metabolism of plants. They are ubiquitously found in fruits, vegetables, tea, and wine. Chemically, flavonoids are classified into several subclasses among them are flavones (2-phenyl-4H-benzopyran-4-ones), aurones (structural isomers of flavones; 2-benzylidene benzofuran-3(2H)- ones) and 2-styryl chromones (vinylogues of flavones). Low molecular weight polyphenolic phytochemical flavonoids play important role in various biological processes at nontoxic concentrations in organisms. Therefore, flavonoids are important components of the human diet. Many natural products belonging to the flavonoid subclasses possess anticancer activity like quercetin and apigenin (flavones), hamiltrone (aurone), hamilcone (chalcone) and hormothamnione (styrylchromone). The role of dietary flavonoids in cancer prevention is well established and widely discussed. Many mechanisms of their action have been identified including cell cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis, inhibition of angiogenesis, antioxidant effect and inhibition of some functional enzymes like cyclindependent kinases, tyrosine kinases, aromatases, topoisomerases, glycogen phosphorylases and reversal of multidrug resistance or a combination of these mechanisms. Naturally obtained flavone moiety having a variety of biological activities can be taken as lead compound for the synthesis of synthetic flavone derivatives with different functional groups at different positions of flavone skelton.

Speaker
Biography:

Sylvain RAMANANARIVO is Full Professor at Ecole Supérieure des Sciences Agronomiques at University of Antananarivo and Deputy General Manager at Ecole Supérieure de Management et d’Informatique Appliquée (ESMIA). His main researches are focused on the farming system, the value chain and the food security.

Abstract:

Madagascar is extremely rich in biodiversity and has a high agricultural potential. However, poverty is still increasing and food insecurity problems remain. As 80% of the population lives in rural areas, promotion and adoption of a relevant agricultural policy will help to overcome those scourges that obstruct the country development. The analysis of agricultural policies shows that there is no real continuity between various policies adopted in Madagascar. During the first Republic, the policy was mainly based on agricultural sector development especially rice and industrial crops. During the recent decades, it has been focused on agricultural diversification or on systems approach. Nowadays, new trends of rural development organizations argue for value chains development. In this research, the main question is: which strategies should be adopted for implementing a regional agricultural development policy to overcome food insecurity? The research has been developed in three steps: (i) dynamics of production systems analysis at farm level, (ii) identification of potential chain value within a region and assessing their competitiveness; (iii) and finally, determination of agricultural development strategies at regional level. Indeed, Malagasy farmer logic is based on the speculations headlights which remain inseparable to complex systems of agricultural production. "Acting on flagship component for acting on the system", equivalent to the optimization of production factors on potential speculation, allows to maximize farmers’ income. In addition, the development of promising sectors, as flagship speculations even in mono-activity in a region and its territories, optimizes household income. Besides, the development of agricultural strategy must combine "systems approach and value chain approach"; it should be based on the optimization of production factors and the improvement of the environment of the value chains to support food security and sustainable development at regional level.

Speaker
Biography:

Ahlam Badreldin El Shikieri has completed her PhD from Queen Margaret University, and has an MBA from Leicester University, UK. She is a registered Consultant Nutritionist, a Certified Public Health Nutritionist and an Associate Professor currently working in Saudi Arabia. She acted as an invited speaker at several workshops and conferences in Sudan, Saudi Arabia, Spain and Taiwan. She supervised several research projects for students both at Master and PhD levels and acted as an external examiner for postgraduate thesis in several universities. She taught nutrition, research and management related modules at the graduate and undergraduate levels. She designed pamphlets for patients with diabetes mellitus, obesity and cancer. She undertook several researches focusing on assessing the nutritional status of cancer patients, children, malnourished hospitalized patients and many others related to public health nutrition. She is a member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, British Nutrition Society, World Public Health Nutrition Association and others. She is a reviewer for various journals including the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior and has acted as an author for more than 15 published research papers and newsletter articles.

Abstract:

Nutritional health during childhood and adolescency is important for supporting the growing body and for preventing future health problems. Fruits and vegetables are important components of a healthy diet. Their consumption varies considerably among and within countries. Large proportions of children do not fulfil the World Health Organization recommendation of eating fruit and vegetables per day. Reduced fruit and vegetables’ consumption is linked to poor health, constipation and increased risk of noncommunicable diseases including cancer. The dietary fibre available in the outer skin of these foods could help to lower blood pressure, and together with phytochemicals such as plant sterols, flavonoids and other antioxidants found in fruit and vegetables may be important in modulating cholesterol and other biological processes. In addition, obesity and overweight among this age group is being linked to low intake of fruit and vegetabhles. The determinants for high consumption levels of fruit and vegetable are found to be related to female gender, low age, high socioeconomic status, high preferences for fruit and vegetables, large parental intake of fruit and vegetables and high availability/accessibility of fruit and vegetables at home as well as peer influence. Possible solutions to improve fruit and vegetables’ consumption include behavioural interventions and improvements in agricultural and food systems. Results from Sudan and Saudi Arabia will be discussed.

Speaker
Biography:

Haleama Al Sabbah is working at Zayed University, Dubai at the Public Health Nutrition Department since Sept. 2013. Haleama has completed her Ph.D in Public Health Nutrition in 2008 from Gent University-Belgium. She got Master in International Community Health with special focus on Diabetes Self-Management in 2000 from Oslo University-Norway. Haleama was a Fulbright Visiting Scholar, did her Post-Doctoral studies in Nutrition at Tufts University, Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Center (2011-2012).

Abstract:

To assess the Prevalence rate of water pipe smoking behavior among university students in West Bank and Dubai and determine the factors associated with water pipe smoking among young people. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: 5 universities in West Bank- Palestine and 5 universities in Dubai- UAE. Participants: 3800 students randomly selected with a response rate of 87.6%. Measurements: Self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data. The key measures were waterpipe smoking, weight, height, cigarettes smoking, dieting to reduce weight, perception and knowledge related waterpipe smoking. Weight, height and waist circumference were measured from a subsample of 500 students. Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated using the WHO cutoffs to identify obese, overweight and underweight students. Findings: In total, 3327 students (54% West Bank and 46% Dubai) included in this analysis. In Dubai, 22% were overweight, and 9% were obese. In West Bank, 14% were overweight, and 4% were obese. 16% in Dubai and 18% in West Bank smoke cigarettes. Quarter of the students in Dubai (26%) and 32% in West Bank smoke waterpipe. 17% in Dubai and 18% in West Bank smoke waterpipe in order to reduce their weight. Significant associations were found between smoking waterpipe and obesity, overweight, and abdominal obesity (p<0.001), Conclusions: Waterpipe smoking is common among university students. Smoking waterpipe is associated with BMI and abdominal obesity. Programs aimed at education, prevention, and intervention for waterpipe use are needed to address the high prevalence rate of waterpipe smoking and this growing public health concern.

Lucia Valverde-Som

PHD Fellow, University of Granada, Spain

Title: Chromatographic fingerprinting for food authentication
Speaker
Biography:

Lucia Valverde-Som are PhD students in Analytical Chemistry; González-Casado is currently Tenured Professor of the Department of Analytical Chemistry; Ruiz-Samblás is PhD and researcher hired by the University of Granada; Cuadros-Rodríguez is Full Professor of the Department of Analytical Chemistry. They work in the same research group "Analysis in Food and Environment". The members of the research group have published more than 150 papers and they work in different projects about virgin olive oil.

Abstract:

Food authentication involves the confirmation of the stated specifications as true. This is a needed requirement because the authentication is bound to the truthfulness and food is considered authentic when it is not affected by any fraud. There are different strategies to perform food authentication. These strategies are dependent of the scientific-technical problem and the type of available analytical information. There are three analytical approaches to study food authentication: (i) to obtain the chemical composition of the food (chemical approach); (ii) to work about biomolecular level (biomolecular approach); (iii) to focus about stable isotopic composition of certain atoms (isotopic approach). Chemical approach are divided in different methodologies: (a) analytical data, which represent the chemical species and chemical markers; (b) compositional profiles, which describes constituents and it gives specific information on particular chemical components; (c) instrumental fingerprints, which contain unspecific and non evident information which should be extracted by chemometric tools. The fingerprinting methodology is based on treating the entire or a part of the instrumental signal as a whole, without identifying or quantifying each compound. There is a great benefit which is the decreasing in time of analysis but it requires the use of chemometrics tool, are essential to extract behaviours, trends or significant information from the data. The aim of this communication is to explain the use of chromatographic fingerprinting for food authentication with different chromatography techniques and the advantages of this methodology.

Speaker
Biography:

Mukhamad Najib has completed his PhD from Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, the University of Tokyo. He has been teaching and doing research in Bogor Agricultural University since 2006. Now, He is the head of Department of Management, Faculty of Economics and Management, Bogor Agricultural University. He has published many papers related to food processing industry, small and medium enterprises as well as agricultural and food marketing. He wrote two books about strategic management and marketing. He is actively promoting food security agenda in Indonesia by strengthening the role of farmer’s group as significant actor in mantaining food availability in rural area.

Abstract:

Growing consumers’ concerns on food safety, health and environment in the recent decade has resulted increased demand for organic food across the world, including emerging economies such as Indonesia. It is important for food producers to understand the behavior of consumers toward organic food so that they can develop appropriate marketing strategy to deal with their competitors. In this paper we present the result of an empirical study of consumer behavior and marketing strategy towards organic food products in Indonesia as emerging market. We provide the description of Indonesian consumers’ perceptions and attitudes concerning organic food based on the field research. The purposes of this study are: (1) to analyze consumers’ perceptions and attitudes of organic food products, (2) to analyze factors influencing consumers buying decision and (3) to analyze marketing strategy of organic food producers in Indonesia. In this case, rural and urban area can be geographic factors affecting different perception among consumer to organic food. A quantitative survey with a sample of 200 consumers living in rural and urban area was conducted to explore consumers’ perception and attitudes related to organic food. Structural Equation Model used to analyze factors influencing consumers buying decision. Three factors affecting consumers’ buying decision will be examined in this research are as follow: (1) attitude, (2) subjective norm and (3) affordability. The results show that there are significant differences between rural and urban consumers in term of perception and attitude to organic food meanwhile subjective norm and affordability influence consumers buying decision significantly. Market education and suitable pricing strategy can be success factors for food organic producers to compete in the Indonesian market.

Speaker
Biography:

Maryam Bahram-Parvar has completed her PhD in Food Science and Technology at the age of 28 years from Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran, collaboratively with University of Guelph, Canada, in 2012. She is currently working as postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Food Science at University of Guelph. Maryam’s highly significant contributions to her field includes more than 15 peer-reviewed journal articles, 2 books, and numerous conference presentations. She has also served as a an active reviewer for several top ranking journals, including “Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition”, “Food Hydrocolloids”, “International Journal of Dairy Technology”, so on.

Abstract:

Physico-chemical analyses are commonly used for measuring quality aspects of ice cream and related products. However, these methods are time consuming, need large quantity of sample and lots of pollutant reagents, and in some cases, obtain limited knowledge of proporties of the products. Consequently, the is a growing demand of the food industries and research institues to have new means of measurements with higher capabilites. Alternative techniques have been introduced to characterize frozen desserts, as complex foods, including rheometry, spectroscopy, X-ray, electro-analytical techniques, ultrasound, and laser, however their application is few. This review discusses the potential of destructive and non-destructive methodologies in determining the quality and characteristics of ice cream and similar products, such as emulsions and foams. Determining the interfacial properties, droplet size distribution, influence of formulation on ice cream structure, and thermo-mechanical properties, visualization of the 3D microstructure, control of freezing, detection of microbial concentration, quantification of different populations of protein in an emulsified system, etc. are of potential applications of novel techniques in ice cream testing. Some of the techniques have demonstrated considerable potential for transferring to the dairy plants as either on- or in-line methods and may be applied nondestructively. However, an accurate determination of the quality and/or identity of frozen dessert seem feasible only when a combination of all parameters is considered and different tests are used.

Speaker
Biography:

Himjyoti Dutta has completed his PhD in 2015 at the age of 31 years from Tezpur University. His research interest primarily includes processing of paddy for value addition and starch modification for targeted commercialization. He is presently working as an Assistant Professor in Amity Institute of Food Technology. His publications include 10 research articles and 1 review article in eputed journals.

Abstract:

Parboiling is a popular post-harvest paddy processing practice in India, Pakistan and African countries. Conventional parboilng involves hydration of paddy by soaking in water followed by open steaming. Steaming under high pressure is a more recent technique practiced for industrial production of parboiled rice. Steaming is followed by drying under the sun or ovens and milling to produce staple grains. A third type called dry heat parboiling involving roasting previously soaked paddy or rice using heated sand or hot pan was earlier considered to produce only speciallity products like popped and puffed rice. However, this process involving instant heating at high temperature also encompasses the molecular changes as seen in steam parboiled rice. The step of drying is not necessary here because extensive drying occurs simultaneously during the heating step. In this study, dry heat parboiling of sufficiently soaked paddy with distinctly differnt amylose content was carried out under controlled conditions of temperature and time. Neither popping of paddy nor excessive puffing of the gelatinized kernels were allowed. The technique resulted in increased kernel hardness resulting in high head rice yield. Excessive damage to the amylopectin resulted in high water uptake properties and gave a continuously rising RVA pasting curve. XRD and DSC analyses indicated formation of starch-lipid complexes. Waxy rice varieties with no amylose content also showed the corresponding peaks, cofirming complex formation amongst amylopectin and lipid after parboiling. Occurence of retrogradation on adding water to gelatinized starch in DSC pan was evident. Dry heat parboiling also notably increased the digestibility of starch in all the varieties. The technique can therefore be effectively used for commercial paddy parboiling to produce staple rice for targeted population groups.

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